Citations with the tag: ROAD Not Taken, The (Poem)

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  • A Road Not Taken.
    Greger, Debora // New England Review (10531297); 2014, Vol. 35 Issue 2, p9 

    The poem "A Road Not Taken," by Hiroshige is presented. First Line: Out of the way, poet! Last Line: Up till the moment he threw his brush away.

  • The Economy in Perspective.
    Greger, Debora // Economic Trends (07482922); Jan1999, p1 

    Presents the poem `The Policy Road Not Taken.'

  • Setting Goals: The Road Not Yet Taken.
    Brodie, Carolyn S. // School Library Media Activities Monthly; Feb2002, Vol. 18 Issue 6, p35 

    Provides information on how to achieve goals of organizations, careers and life. Application of the message of the poem 'The Road Not Taken,' by Robert Frost to the goals and objectives of school library program; Guidelines in reevaluating the goals and planning for a school year.

  • THE ROAD NOT TAKEN.
    Frost, Robert // Mountain Interval; 1/1/1916, p3 

    The poem "The Road Not Taken" is presented. First Line: Two roads diverged in a yellow wood, Last Line: And that has made all the difference.

  • The Road Not Taken.
    Frost, Robert // CCPA Monitor; May2010, Vol. 17 Issue 1, p27 

    The article presents the poem "The Road Not Taken," by Robert Frost. First Line: Two roads diverged in a yellow wood, Last Line: And that has made all the difference.

  • The Road Not Taken.
    von Dreele, W. H. // National Review; 7/15/1996, Vol. 48 Issue 13, p28 

    The article presents the poem "The Road Not Taken," by W.H. Von Dreele. First Line: Although Christopher sat in their laps; Last Line: Though one's never sure, under those wraps.

  • ROBERT FROST'S ESSAY 'THE CONSTANT SYMBOL' AND ITS RELATIONSHIP TO 'THE ROAD NOT TAKEN'
    Eisiminger, Sterling // American Notes & Queries; Mar/Apr81, Vol. 19 Issue 7/8, p114 

    Talks about the relation between Robert Frost's essay 'The Constant Symbol' and his poem 'The Road Not Taken.' Paragraph taken from 'The Constant Symbol,' which is most pertinent to Frost's poem; Subject of the poem; Discussion on the poem as a satirical portrait.

  • The Road Not Taken.
    Frost, Robert // Journal of Philosophy & History of Education; 2009, Vol. 59, p62 

    The article presents the poem "The Road Not Taken," by Robert Frost. First Line: Two roads diverged in a yellow wood, Last Line: And that has made all the difference.

  • The Roads Not Taken.
    Frost, Robert // Tennessee Tribune; 1/20/2011, Vol. 22 Issue 3, p14B 

    The poem "The Roads not Taken" by Robert Frost is presented. First Line: Two roads diverged in a yellow wood, Last Line: And that has made all the difference.

  • The Road Not Taken.
    Frost, Robert // IBA Business Review; Jan-Jun2014, Vol. 9 Issue 1, p144 

    The poem "The Road Not Taken," by Robert Frost is presented. First Line: Two roads diverged in a yellow wood, Last Line: And that has made all the difference.

  • The Road Not Taken.
    Frost, Robert // Second Book of Modern Verse; a Selection from the Work of Contem; 1/1/1920, p9 

    Presents the poem "The Road Not Taken," by Robert Frost. First Line: Two roads diverged in a yellow wood, Last Line: And that has made all the difference.

  • The Road not Taken.
    Frost, Robert // IBA Business Review; 2011, Vol. 6 Issue 1, p130 

    The poem "The Road not Taken," by Robert Frost is presented. First Line: Yet knowing how way leads on to way; Last Line: And that has made all the difference.

  • The Road Not Taken.
    Frost, Robert // Second Book of Modern Verse; a Selection from the Work of Contem; 1/1/1920, p9 

    Presents the poem "The Road Not Taken," by Robert Frost. First Line: Two roads diverged in a yellow wood, Last Line: And that has made all the difference.

  • The Road Not Taken.
    Frost, Robert // Second Book of Modern Verse; a Selection from the Work of Contem; 1/1/1920, p9 

    Presents the poem "The Road Not Taken," by Robert Frost. First Line: Two roads diverged in a yellow wood, Last Line: And that has made all the difference.

  • The Road Not Taken.
    Frost, Robert // Collected Classic Poems, Coleridge to Gascoigne; 2012, p1 

    The poem "The Road Not Taken," by Robert Frost is presented. First Line: Two roads diverged in a yellow wood, Last Line: And that has made all the difference.

  • The Road Not Taken: an occupational therapy perspective.
    Craik, Christine // British Journal of Occupational Therapy; Jul2009, Vol. 72 Issue 7, p285 

    The author reflects on the significance of the poem "The Road Not Taken," by Robert Frost for decision making among occupational therapists in Great Britain. She notes that the poem serves as a reminder to reflect on the decisions that will be made. She highlights the impact of the entrepreneurs...

  • The Power of Poetry.
    VLEET, CARMELLA VAN // Instructor; Spring2013, Vol. 122 Issue 5, p69 

    The article presents several poetry lesson plans for students in grades 6-8 on topics such as allegory using the poem "The Road Not Taken" by Robert Frost, imagery using the poem "Oranges" by Gary Soto, and figurative language using the poem "When Death Comes" by Mary Oliver.

  • Standardized tests and the threat to creativity.
    Simpson, Alyson // Book 2.0; Jun2013, Vol. 2 Issue 1/2, p17 

    The article discusses the difficult decision for educators to follow standardized methods or to formulate own discourses. It relates the poem "The Road Not Taken," by Robert Frost which serves as a warning about the paths people chose. It states that standardized education limits the learning...

  • What Road Are We On?
    Foor, Ryan // Agricultural Education Magazine; Mar/Apr2014, Vol. 86 Issue 5, p4 

    A personal narrative from Ryan Foor, Assistant Professor of Agricultural Education at the University of Arizona, is presented which explores his journey of agricultural education and also presents a poem "The Road not Taken" by American poet Robert Frost.

  • ROBERT FROST.
    Foor, Ryan // Atlantic; Nov2007, Vol. 300 Issue 4, p148 

    An excerpt from a reprint of the poem "The Road Not Taken," by Robert Frost, which appeared in the August 1915 issue of "The Atlantic Monthly," is presented.

  • THE CONCEPT OF THE JOURNEY.
    Mills, Jane // Australian Screen Education; Autumn2004, Issue 34, p34 

    The article presents a slightly modified version of a lecture given at the English Teachers' Association of New South Wales HSC Area of Study Student Day at Darling Harbour on November 3, 2003. A metaphor is a figure of speech, a literary or visual image, that's used to compare two different...

  • Robert Frost and dramatic speech.
    McNair, Wesley // Sewanee Review; Winter98, Vol. 106 Issue 1, p68 

    The article discusses the work of the American poet Robert Frost, with particular focus given to his use of dramatic speech and choice to avoid naturalistic language. Poems including "Birches," "The Road Not Taken," and "Mending Wall" are commented on, and Frost's influence of free verse poetry...

  • The Road Not Taken.
    Frost, Robert // Literary Imagination; Fall2005, Vol. 7 Issue 3, p306 

    Presents the poem "The Road Not Taken," by Robert Frost, translated by Rhina P. Espaillat. First Line: Two roads diverged in a yellow wood, Last Line: And that has made all the difference.

  • The Road Less Traveled.
    Slagle, William F. // CRANIO: The Journal of Craniomandibular Practice; Oct2009, Vol. 27 Issue 4, p215 

    The author focuses on the impact of the decisions made by dentists related to craniofacial pain on their lives, that of their students and of their patients. He cites a stanza in the poem "The Road Not Taken," by Robert Frost which states that people make decisions throughout their lives that...

  • Literary Contexts in Poetry: Robert Frost's "The Road Not Taken".
    Bouchard, Jennifer // Literary Contexts in Poetry: Robert Frost's 'The Road Not Taken'; Apr2008, p1 

    Robert Frost's "The Road Not Taken" is a four-stanza poem in which the speaker compares his walk in the woods with the journey of life. When the speaker comes to a fork in the wooded road, he must choose which road to walk and realizes that the direction he went made all the difference in his life.

  • in your words.
    Bouchard, Jennifer // NEA Today; Oct/Nov2009, Vol. 28 Issue 2, p11 

    The article provides several answers to a question asked of teachers regarding what three books students should read before graduating including "The Little Engine That Could," by Watty Piper, the poem "The Road Not Taken," by Robert Frost, and "A Tree Grows in Brooklyn," by Betty Smith.

  • Frost's "Road" & "Woods" redux.
    Brown, Dan // New Criterion; Apr2007, Vol. 25 Issue 8, p11 

    The article offers poetry criticism of the 1916 poem "The Road Not Taken," by Robert Frost. Particular focus is given to Frost's use of metaphor and to his exploration of life's journey in the poem. "The Road Not Taken" is also compared to another poem of Frost's, "Stopping By Woods on a Snowy...

  • Why Teachers Can't Read Poetry.
    Kilgore, John // Vocabula Review; Feb2003, Vol. 5 Issue 2, p1 

    In this article the author comments on the teaching and studying of American poetry in high schools. He emphasizes a popular misreading of the poem "The Road Not Taken" by Robert Frost and suggests that students expect good poetry to be simple and for the meaning of poems to be easy to...

  • I TOOK THE ROAD LESS TRAVELLED BY: SELF-DECEPTION IN FROST'S AND ELIOT'S EARLY POETRY.
    Vujin, Bojana // Annual Review of the Faculty of Philosophy / Godisnjak Filozofsk; 2011, Vol. 36 Issue 1, p195 

    The paper deals with two famous Modernist poems, Robert Frost's "The Road Not Taken" and T. S. Eliot's "The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock," focusing on the poets' decision to employ self-deception and irony. An attempt is given at an explanation for the use of these devices, and a brief...

  • Three Stabs at the Truth.
    Eisiminger, Skip // South Carolina Review; Spring2012, Vol. 44 Issue 2, p182 

    The article presents three divergent reflections on the appreciation of classic literary tropes within everyday language and culture in the United States as of 2012. The author references the common satirical treatment of Robert Frost's poem "The Road Not Taken," the mispronunciation of the poem...

  • WHAT’S ON DOUG CONANT’S BOOKSHELF?
    Eisiminger, Skip // T+D; Jul2014, Vol. 68 Issue 7, p75 

    No abstract available.

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