Citations with the tag: POPE, Alexander, 1688-1744

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  • NRAEF hires Pope as new VP of fund-raising.
     // Nation's Restaurant News; 5/19/2003, Vol. 37 Issue 20, p58 

    Reports on the appointment of Alexander F. Pope as vice president for fund-raising of the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation. Career background; Responsibilities in the association.

  • Anonating a Career: From Pope's Homer to The Dunciad: From Madame Dacier to Madame Dacier by Way of Swift.
    Weinbrot, Howard D. // Philological Quarterly; Fall2000, Vol. 79 Issue 4, p459 

    Focuses on the career of author Alexander Pope. Description of the career of Pope; Movement of Pope's editorial machinery in 'Iliad' to the epic 'Dunciad'; Circulation of the 'Proposals for a Translation of Homer's Iliad' in 1713.

  • Defining self and others: Pope and eighteenth-century gender ideology.
    Fabricant, Carole // Criticism; Fall97, Vol. 39 Issue 4, p503 

    Explores the dialectical interaction between the voices of marginality and dominance, with focus on the work of author Alexander Pope. Suggestion that the Pope is a bourgeois misogynist in terms of his sexual ideology; Role that individual expressions and meditations play in social and...

  • Pope: The papist and the poet.
    Woodman, Thomas // Essays in Criticism; Jul96, Vol. 46 Issue 3, p219 

    Focuses on the religious aspects of the works of poet Alexander Pope. Hardly regarded as a Catholic poet; Primarily non-religious themes; Classical motif; Catholic influences and images; Differentiation between Pope as poet and his father as Papist; Commitment to moral truth; Little reference...

  • EVE IN THE ODYSSEY.
    Buckmann, Patricia // American Notes & Queries; Jan/Feb84, Vol. 22 Issue 5/6, p73 

    Discusses the character of Eve in 'Odyssey,' by Alexander Pope as cited in the book 'The Iliad of Homer,' edited by Maynard Mack. Excerpt from the poem.

  • Pope's `fox obscene': Some precursors and some successors.
    Sherbo, Arthur // Notes & Queries; Jun94, Vol. 41 Issue 2, p187 

    Presents an analysis of Alexander Pope's usage of the phrase `fox obscene' in his poetry. Precursors and successors.

  • Untitled Image.
    Sherbo, Arthur // Complete Poetical Works of Alexander Pope; 1903, preceding p1 

    An image of poet Alexander Pope is presented.

  • BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH.
    Sherbo, Arthur // Complete Poetical Works of Alexander Pope; 1903, preceding p1 

    A biography of poet Alexander Pope is presented.

  • A PARAPHRASE (ON THOMAS À KEMPIS,L. III. C. 2).
    POPE, ALEXANDER // Complete Poetical Works of Alexander Pope; 1903, p1 

    The poem "A Paraphrase: On Thomas À Kempis,L. III. C. 2" by Alexander Pope is presented. First Line: Supposed to have been written in 1700; first; Last Line: Thy greater Glory,and my greater Good!

  • CHAUCER.
    POPE, ALEXANDER // Complete Poetical Works of Alexander Pope; 1903, p15 

    The poem "Chaucer" by Alexander Pope is presented. First Line: Women ben full of ragerie, Last Line: Then trust on Mon Whose yerde can talke,'

  • WEEPING.
    POPE, ALEXANDER // Complete Poetical Works of Alexander Pope; 1903, p17 

    The poem "Weeping," by Alexander Pope is presented. First Line: While Celia's tears make sorrow bright, Last Line: To set, like him, Heav'n too on fire.

  • PHRYNE.
    POPE, ALEXANDER // Complete Poetical Works of Alexander Pope; 1903, p18 

    The poem "Phryne," by Alexander Pope is presented. First Line: Phryne had talents for mankind; Last Line: Then painted butterflies.

  • ARGUS.
    POPE, ALEXANDER // Complete Poetical Works of Alexander Pope; 1903, p79 

    The poem "Argus," by Alexander Pope is presented. First Line: When wise Ulysses, from his native coast; Last Line: died!

  • THE TRANSLATOR.
    POPE, ALEXANDER // Complete Poetical Works of Alexander Pope; 1903, p80 

    The poem "The Translator," by Alexander Pope is presented. First Line: Ozell, at Sanger's call, invoked his; Last Line: The Biter!

  • MESSIAH.
    POPE, ALEXANDER // Complete Poetical Works of Alexander Pope; 1903, p84 

    The poem "Messiah," by Alexander Pope is presented. First Line: Ye Nymphs of Solyma! Begin the song: Last Line: reigns!

  • MACER.
    POPE, ALEXANDER // Complete Poetical Works of Alexander Pope; 1903, p102 

    The poem "Macer," by Alexander Pope is presented. First Line: When simple Macer, now of high renown, Last Line: punk.

  • EPITAPH.
    POPE, ALEXANDER // Complete Poetical Works of Alexander Pope; 1903, p121 

    The poem "Epitaph," by Alexander Pope is presented. First Line: Here lies Lord Coningsby - be civil! Last Line: The rest God knows - perhaps the Devil.

  • CELIA.
    POPE, ALEXANDER // Complete Poetical Works of Alexander Pope; 1903, p125 

    The poem "Celia," by Alexander Pope is presented. First Line: Celia, we know, is sixty-five, Last Line: Too ancient for our gallantry!

  • PROLOGUE.
    POPE, ALEXANDER // Complete Poetical Works of Alexander Pope; 1903, p125 

    The poem "Prologue," by Alexander Pope is presented. First Line: As when that hero, who in each campaign; Last Line: friend.

  • EPIGRAM.
    POPE, ALEXANDER // Complete Poetical Works of Alexander Pope; 1903, p128 

    An untitled poem by Alexander Pope is presented. First Line: My lord complains that Pope, stark mad; Last Line: bill!

  • EPIGRAM.
    POPE, ALEXANDER // Complete Poetical Works of Alexander Pope; 1903, p128 

    An untitled poem by Alexander Pope is presented. First Line: Yes! 't is the time (I cried), impose the; Last Line: To take the only way to be forgiv'n.

  • TO ERINNA.
    POPE, ALEXANDER // Complete Poetical Works of Alexander Pope; 1903, p130 

    The poem "To Erinna" by Alexander Pope is presented. First Line: Tho' sprightly sappho force our love and; Last Line: And, unobserv'd, the glaring sun declines.

  • I: EPIGRAM.
    POPE, ALEXANDER // Complete Poetical Works of Alexander Pope; 1903, p132 

    An untitled poem by Alexander Pope is presented. First Line: Did Milton's prose, O Charles, thy death; Last Line: murder. INSET: LINES WRITTEN IN WINDSOR.

  • II: EPIGRAM.
    POPE, ALEXANDER // Complete Poetical Works of Alexander Pope; 1903, p132 

    An untitled poem by Alexander Pope is presented. First Line: Should D(enni)s print, how once you; Last Line: Secure in dulness, madness, want, and age. INSET: LINES WRITTEN IN WINDSOR.

  • IV: EPIGRAM.
    POPE, ALEXANDER // Complete Poetical Works of Alexander Pope; 1903, p132 

    An untitled poem by Alexander Pope is presented. First Line: Once in his life m(oo)re judges right: Last Line: Who's but a publisher himself. INSET: LINES WRITTEN IN WINDSOR.

  • V: EPIGRAM.
    POPE, ALEXANDER // Complete Poetical Works of Alexander Pope; 1903, p132 

    An untitled poem by Alexander Pope is presented. First Line: A gold watch found on cinder whore, last Line: Not that they're rich, but that they steal. INSET: LINES WRITTEN IN WINDSOR.

  • VIII: EPIGRAM.
    POPE, ALEXANDER // Complete Poetical Works of Alexander Pope; 1903, p133 

    An untitled poem by Alexander Pope is presented. First Line: The sting of this epigram was for Cibber, Last Line: Oh! save the salary, and drink the sack. INSET: LINES WRITTEN IN WINDSOR.

  • IX: EPIGRAM.
    POPE, ALEXANDER // Complete Poetical Works of Alexander Pope; 1903, p133 

    An untitled poem by Alexander Pope is presented. First Line: Behold! ambitious of the British's bays, Last Line: write. INSET: LINES WRITTEN IN WINDSOR.

  • ADVERTISEMENT.
    POPE, ALEXANDER // Complete Poetical Works of Alexander Pope; 1903, p156 

    The article offers information on several books of poet Alexander Pope.

  • SATIRES OF DR. JOHN DONNE, DEAN OF ST. PAUL'S, VERSIFIED: SATIRES II.
    POPE, ALEXANDER // Complete Poetical Works of Alexander Pope; 1903, p202 

    The poem "Satire" Part II by Alexander Pope is presented. First Line: Yes, thank my stars! as early as I knew; Last Line: Within the reach of treason or the law.

  • SATIRES OF DR. JOHN DONNE, DEAN OF ST. PAUL'S, VERSIFIED: SATIRE IV.
    POPE, ALEXANDER // Complete Poetical Works of Alexander Pope; 1903, p204 

    The poem "Satire" Part IV by Alexander Pope is presented. First Line: Well, if it be my time to quit the stage, Last Line: In time to come, may pass for holy writ.

  • BOOK XVII.
    POPE, ALEXANDER // Complete Poetical Works of Alexander Pope; 1903, p602 

    An untitled poem by Alexander Pope is presented. First Line: Soon as Aurora, daughter of the dawn, Last Line: The sun obliquely shot his dewy ray.

  • BOOK XXIV.
    POPE, ALEXANDER // Complete Poetical Works of Alexander Pope; 1903, p626 

    An untitled poem by Alexander Pope is presented. First Line: Cyllenius now to Pluto's dreary region; Last Line: lord.

  • BIBLIOGRAPHICAL NOTE.
    POPE, ALEXANDER // Complete Poetical Works of Alexander Pope; 1903, p666 

    A bibliography on the subject of poems is presented which includes the books "The Works of Mr. Alexander Pope," "The Works of Mr. Alexander Pope in Prose" and "The Works of Mr. Alexander Pope, Esq."

  • INDEX OF FIRST LINES.
    POPE, ALEXANDER // Complete Poetical Works of Alexander Pope; 1903, p667 

    A first line index for the January 1, 1903 issue of "The Complete Poetical Works of Alexander Pope" is presented.

  • INDEX OF TITLES.
    POPE, ALEXANDER // Complete Poetical Works of Alexander Pope; 1903, p670 

    A poem title index for the January 1, 1903 issue of "The Complete Poetical Works of Alexander Pope" is presented.

  • ALEXANDER POPE AND 'THE CROWN OF POLAND'.
    Pritchard, Jonathan // Notes & Queries; Sep2002, Vol. 49 Issue 3, p364 

    Focuses on the interest of litterateur Alexander Pope in politics and diplomatic missions in Poland. Ambition for leadership of the country; Manifestations of the intentions of Pope in his writings; Excerpts of the writings of Pope.

  • ARGUS.
    Pope, Alexander // Dog's Book of Verse; 1/1/1916, p47 

    The poem "Argus," by Alexander Pope is presented. First Line: When wise Ulysses, from his native coast; Last Line: Owned his returning lord, looked up, and died.

  • SOLITUDE.
    Pope, A. // Golden Treasury; 1/1/1904, p159 

    The poem "Solitude," by Alexander Pope is presented. First Line: Happy the man, whose wish and care; Last Line: Tell where I lie.

  • MESSIAH.
    POPE, ALEXANDER // World's Best Poetry, Volume 4, The Higher Life; 1/1/1904, p63 

    The poem "Messiah," by Alexander Pope, is presented. First Line: Ye nymphs of Solyma! begin the song: Last Line: Thy realm for ever lasts, thy own Messiah reigns!

  • Impromptu.
    Pope, Alexander // Collected Classic Poems, Pope to Sterling; 2012, p1 

    The poem "Impromptu" by Francesca Wilde is presented. First Line: In vain you boast poetic names of yore, Last Line: But shines himself till they are seen no more.

  • Prefatory Matter(s) in the Shakespeare Editions of Nicholas Rowe and Alexander Pope.
    Candido, Joseph // Studies in Philology; Spring2000, Vol. 97 Issue 2, p210 

    Discusses the William Shakespeare editions of Nicholas Rowe and Alexander Pope, notable men of letters. Description of the friendship between Rowe and Pope; Information on the religious and political beliefs of Rowe and Pope; Comparison of Pope's and Rowe's editions.

  • What's in a Name?
    Gardner, Karen // Trustee; May2005, Vol. 58 Issue 5, p2 

    Presents an article about the term hospitalist. Analogy from the Alexander Pope poem, "The Rape of the Locke"; Concept about hospitalist; Introduction to an article about hospitalist.

  • Page two.
    Gardner, Karen // Indianapolis Business Journal; 2/19/96, Vol. 16 Issue 49, p2A 

    Presents a quotation from Alexander Pope on the noblest work of God.

  • A 'tender Correspondence': Pope and The Spectator.
    Varney, Andrew // Critical Survey; 2002, Vol. 14 Issue 3, p42 

    Presents an analysis of gender relations in early eighteenth-century concerning the epistle Alexander Pope's 'Epistle to Miss Blount.' Definition of epistle; Details on moral and stylistic qualities of the aristocratic French culture; Information on the publication, 'The Spectator.'

  • REPLIES.
    Robinson, Frank K.; Banks, Paul N.; Raum, Hans; Drost, Jerome; Cohn, Alan M.; Trent, Jonathan A.; Javor, George; Ash, Lee; Rachow, Louis A.; Thompson, Lawrence S. // American Notes & Queries; Nov71, Vol. 10 Issue 3, p40 

    Presents the replies to questions on topics and issues related to art and literature. Origin of the term curtain lecture; Description of the art of gauffering; Painting of Alexander Pope.

  • VICE.
    Pope, Alexander // Book of Epigrams; 1/1/1902, p24 

    The poem "Vice," by Alexander Pope, is presented. First Line: Vice is a monster of so frightful mien, Last Line: We first endure, then pity, then embrace.

  • THE BARON REPLIES AGAIN.
    Eisenberg, Ila R. // American Notes & Queries; Apr1980, Vol. 18 Issue 8, p122 

    Presents a critical analysis of the poem 'Rape of the Lock,' by Alexander Pope. Modern interpretation of the poem.

  • A mock-biblical controversy: Sir Richard Blackmore in the...
    Jemielity, Thomas // Philological Quarterly; Sum95, Vol. 74 Issue 3, p249 

    Focuses on the prominent role Sir Richard Blackmore plays in the publication of Alexander Pope's `Duncaid.' Other publications; Pope's intentions; Information on Christianity; Other writings by Pope involving his views on Blackmore; Notes.

  • Pope's Transformation of Homer's Similes.
    Schwandt, Pamela Poynter // Studies in Philology; Fall79, Vol. 76 Issue 4, p387 

    Discusses medieval author Alexander Pope's translation of ancient Greek author Homer's 'Iliad' within the context of Pope's handling of Homer's extended similes in the poem. Analysis of the Virgilian standard by which Pope's translation of the 'Iliad' would finally be judged; Analysis of Pope's...

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