Citations with the tag: FRAUD in science

Results 51 - 100

  • Research Universities and Scientific Misconduct.
    Steneck, Nicholas H. // Journal of Higher Education; May/Jun94, Vol. 65 Issue 3, p310 

    Describes the evolution of research misconduct policies developed by universities since the late 1970s. Research universities' slow acceptance of responsibility for research misconduct; Need for the examination of research environments and place more emphasis on research ethics.

  • Misconduct and Social Control in Science.
    Fox, Mary Frank; Braxton, John M. // Journal of Higher Education; May/Jun94, Vol. 65 Issue 3, p373 

    Analyzes the roles of segments of the trans-scientific community in exercising social control of misconduct. Roles of the federal government, universities, scientific journals and individual scientists; Limitations on control; Other issues in the exercise of social control; Recommended policy...

  • Not guilty.
    Fox, Mary Frank; Braxton, John M. // New Scientist; 11/13/93, Vol. 140 Issue 1899, p14 

    Reports on the ruling of an appeals panel at the United States Department of Health and Human Services on the scientific misconduct charges against AIDS researcher Mikulas Popovic. Case filed by the Office of Research Integrity; Paper published by Popovic with Robert Gallo in 1984.

  • Conduct unbecoming--The MRC's approach.
    Evans, Imogen // BMJ: British Medical Journal (International Edition); 06/06/98, Vol. 316 Issue 7146, p1728 

    Examines the serious manner in which the Medical Research Council (MRC) handles scientific misconduct. View that research results cannot be trusted if the research was not conducted with integrity; MRC's policy and procedure for handling allegations of scientific misconduct; The stepwise...

  • Honest advice from Denmark.
    Riis, Povl // BMJ: British Medical Journal (International Edition); 06/06/98, Vol. 316 Issue 7146, p1733 

    Advises that the development of an independent national system covering all health sciences should be established to unmask and prevent research misconduct within medical science. Effect of one case of misconduct on the relationship between society and biomedical research; Why the national...

  • Moving targets.
    Riis, Povl // Nature; 9/12/1996, Vol. 383 Issue 6596, p105 

    Opinion. Discusses the complications surrounding the treatment of those charged with scientific fraud and malpractice. The needs of future employers; The protection of those accused. The consideration of institutionalized means of dealing with the problem.

  • Private investigators track down fraudsters.
    Riis, Povl // Nature; 9/12/1996, Vol. 383 Issue 6596, p108 

    Reports on the activities of Medico-Legal Investigations, a private British agency that investigates fraud and misconduct in clinical research. Co-founder Frank Wells, former director of medical affairs for the Association of the British Pharmaceutical Industry; Co-founder Peter Jay, a former...

  • Letter instead of a critique.
    Holton, Gerald // Erwägen Wissen Ethik; 2004, Vol. 15 Issue 4, p484 

    Presents a letter to the editor referencing Ralf Ottermann's article about scientific fraud, published in this issue of the periodical "Deliberation Knowledge Ethics."

  • Brief statt Kritik.
    Schönhöfer, Peter S. // Erwägen Wissen Ethik; 2004, Vol. 15 Issue 4, p499 

    Presents a letter to the editor referencing Ralf Ottermann's article about scientific fraud, published in this issue of the periodical "Deliberation Knowledge Ethics."

  • `Whistleblowers face blast of hostility.'
    Macilwain, Colin // Nature; 2/20/1997, Vol. 385 Issue 6618, p669 

    Discusses the problems faced by those who alert authorities to alleged instances of scientific misconduct. The hostility towards whistleblowers; Comments from Dan Greenberg, editor of the newsletter `Science and Government Report.'

  • French inquiry to look into thesis fraud.
    Glover, Eric // Nature; 1/15/1998, Vol. 391 Issue 6664, p213 

    Reports that France's Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) and the Centre de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) are jointly investigating the apparent fabrication of data in a doctoral thesis. Manipulation of results; First clear example of scientific fraud at CEA; Question of how student was able to...

  • Misconduct in science.
    Nagar, P. K. // Current Science (00113891); 5/25/2008, Vol. 94 Issue 10, p1231 

    A letter to the editor discussing various cases of plagiarism and misconduct in science is presented.

  • Observations on 'Plagiarism, a scourge'.
    Bapat, Arun // Current Science (00113891); 5/25/2008, Vol. 94 Issue 10, p1231 

    A letter to the editor discussing observations in the increasing plagiarism activity in science is presented.

  • LAB BABBLE.
    Swan, Russ // Laboratory News; Aug2014, p14 

    The article presents the author's comments on the presentation of known facts as scientific discoveries on television.

  • China fights fraud with tough tactics and integrity training.
    Michel, Martin C. // Nature; 2/18/2010, Vol. 463 Issue 7283, p877 

    A letter to the editor is presented in response to an article on the prevention of scientific fraud in China, that was published in a previous issue.

  • Letter to the Editor.
    Saidi, Farrokh; Nayemouri, Touraj // Archives of Iranian Medicine (AIM); May2009, Vol. 12 Issue 3, p335 

    A letter to the editor is presented in response to the article about plagiarism on scientific fraud that was published in the previous issue.

  • Reflections on scientific fraud.
    Saidi, Farrokh; Nayemouri, Touraj // Nature; 10/3/2002, Vol. 419 Issue 6906, p417 

    Reports on the scientific fraud committed by condensed-matter physicist Jan Hendrik Schon. Inquiry conducted on the work of Schon; Selection of reviewers; Improvement of procedures for investigating misconduct.

  • Misconduct finding at Bell Labs shakes physics community.
    Brumfiel, Geoff // Nature; 10/3/2002, Vol. 419 Issue 6906, p419 

    Reports on the falsification of research data by condensed-matter physicist Jan Hendrik Schon. Inquiry conducted on the work of Schon at Bell Laboratories; Creation of transistors out of single molecules; Induction of superconductivity in carbon buckyballs. INSET: Keeping up appearences.

  • Authors slow to retract `fraudulent' papers.
    Schiermeier, Quirin // Nature; 6/4/1998, Vol. 393 Issue 6684, p402 

    Reports that only two of 47 fraudulent scientific papers involved in a German scandal have been retracted. Why authors are reluctant to retract; Response of journals that published the papers; Retraction policies in scientific journals.

  • Science meets pseudoscience.
    Schiermeier, Quirin // Skeptic; 1999, Vol. 7 Issue 3, p16 

    Reports on the preponderance of pseudoscientific claims and `inventions' at the 1999 International Conference on Science and Consciousness. Purported benefits of the `love machine' that was on display at the conference; Unveiling of a `perpetual motion machine' that failed to work; Increase in...

  • Consequences of Faking History.
    Kuhl, Jackson // dig; Feb2009, Vol. 11 Issue 2, p12 

    The article reports on the fraud committed by archaeologist Shinichi Fujimura, who confessed he had buried artifacts in excavation sites around Japan in order to be uncovered later.

  • Each co-author should sign to reduce risk of fraud.
    Yager, Kevin // Nature; 11/29/2007, Vol. 450 Issue 7170, p610 

    A letter to the editor is presented in response to the article "Who is accountable" in the 2007 issue.

  • Lessons from the Pearce affair: Handling scientific fraud.
    Lock, Stephen // BMJ: British Medical Journal (International Edition); 6/17/95, Vol. 310 Issue 6994, p1547 

    Focuses on the impact of the case of gynecologist Malcolm Pearce, who was removed from the British medical register for fraud. Publication of two papers in the `British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology' describing work that had never taken place; Implications for medical journals; Issue of...

  • Consultant struck off for fraudulent claims.
    Dyer, Owen // BMJ: British Medical Journal (International Edition); 6/17/95, Vol. 310 Issue 6994, p1554 

    Reports that obstetrician Malcolm Pearce was found guilty by the British General Medical Council of serious professional misconduct after fraudulently claiming to have performed a pioneering operation. Termination from his post as a senior obstetric consultant at London, England-based Saint...

  • Austria: Academy of Sciences states its case.
    Schuster, Peter; Friesinger, Herwig // Nature; 10/2/2008, Vol. 455 Issue 7213, p589 

    A letter to the editor is presented in response to an editorial on scientific misconduct titled "Scandalous behavior," featured in the 454th issue of "Nature."

  • Editors and their priorities about libel and fraud.
    Garrow, John S // BMJ: British Medical Journal (International Edition); 1/24/2004, Vol. 328 Issue 7433, p230 

    Presents a letter to the editor in response to an article by A. Ferriman called "Have editors got their priorities right?," published in the November 8, 2003 edition of this magazine.

  • Editors and their priorities about libel and fraud.
    Wilmshurst, Peter // BMJ: British Medical Journal (International Edition); 1/24/2004, Vol. 328 Issue 7433, p230 

    Presents a letter to the editor in response to an article by A. Ferriman called "Have editors got their priorities right?," published in the November 8, 2003 edition of this magazine.

  • Editors and their priorities about libel and fraud.
    Lange, John H // BMJ: British Medical Journal (International Edition); 1/24/2004, Vol. 328 Issue 7433, p230 

    Presents a letter to the editor in response to an article by A. Ferriman called "Have editors got their priorities right?," published in the November 8, 2003 edition of this magazine.

  • Book reviews.
    Teich, Albert H. // Journal of Higher Education; Sep/Oct93, Vol. 64 Issue 5, p604 

    Reviews the book `Impure Science: Fraud, Compromise, and Political Influence in Scientific Research,' by Robert Bell. Cases of fraud and financial conflict of interest in research; `Baltimore Case'; Awarding of the Earthquake Engineering Research Center to the State University of New York at...

  • Cheating in Science.
    Dixon, Bernard // Sciences; Mar79, Vol. 19 Issue 3, p29 

    Focuses on several scientific frauds. Attitudes of scientists toward publication of scientific frauds; Vigilance of scientist on expunging discredited data; Examples of scientist cheating on their discoveries.

  • PEER REVIEW: Letters from Readers.
    Rice, Marilyn; Sobol, Bruce J.; Jeffery, Philip; Marks, Steven; Corbett, James W. // Sciences; Mar/Apr90, Vol. 30 Issue 2, p10 

    Presents several letters to the editor concerning science and health in the March 1990 issue of the journal 'The New York Academy of Sciences.' Impact of electroconvulsive therapy on long-term memory; Factors leading to fraud by scientist; Relationship between mental illness and creativity.

  • Fraud in Australia.
    Rice, Marilyn; Sobol, Bruce J.; Jeffery, Philip; Marks, Steven; Corbett, James W. // BMJ: British Medical Journal (International Edition); 11/12/88, Vol. 297 Issue 6658, p1220 

    Reports the impact of the connection between thalidomide and birth defects on the development of scientific fraud in Australia. Concern on the accusation of fraud on the teratogenic effects of hyoscine; Production of litters with malformations; Toxic dose of hyoscine.

  • Institutional and editorial misconduct in the MMR scare.
    Godlee, Fiona // BMJ: British Medical Journal (Overseas & Retired Doctors Edition; 1/22/2011, Vol. 342 Issue 7790, preceding p179 

    The article discusses various papers published within the issue including the one on the secrets of the MMR vaccine scare, one on the fraud on Wakefield's research on MMR and another on the proposed establishment of a research agency.

  • Fraud follows the funds.
    Godlee, Fiona // Nature Medicine; May2006, Vol. 12 Issue 5, p491 

    A chart that shows data of misconduct cases from top 10 top-funded National Institutes of Health grantees in the U.S. is presented.

  • No end in sight for German misconduct probe.
    Kerstholt, Marion // Nature; 5/2/2002, Vol. 417 Issue 6884, p6 

    Investigates the alleged scientific fraud at a university in Germany. Concern over the lack of mechanisms to handle the case; Details of the investigation concerning a clinical trial; Occurrence of dramatic regression of secondary tumors.

  • Harvard faces questions on missing data.
    Dalton, Rex // Nature; 3/20/1997, Vol. 386 Issue 6622, p206 

    Reports on the controversy surrounding the absence of documentation on key experiments in research conducted by a center affiliated to Harvard Medical School. The investigation by the US Department of Veterans' Affairs; The possibility of treating the case as scientific misconduct.

  • Potential Fraud in Fig 2: JID 103:92–96, 1994.
    Krutman, J. // Journal of Investigative Dermatology; Aug2003, Vol. 121 Issue 2, p424 

    With regard to the article mentioned in the August 2003 issue of 'Journal of Investigative Dermatology,' authors would like to inform about a potential fraud in the manuscript. This suspicion is based on the fact that the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft Taskforce investigating the scientific...

  • Potential Fraud in Fig 2: JID 103:92–96, 1994.
    Krutmann, Jean; Grewe, Markus; Budnik, Anne // Journal of Investigative Dermatology; Aug2003, Vol. 121 Issue 2, p424 

    With regard to the article mentioned in the August 2003 issue of 'Journal of Investigative Dermatology,' authors would like to inform about a potential fraud in a figure of the manuscript. This suspicion is based on the fact that the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft Taskforce investigating the...

  • The Strange Case of Emil Rupp.
    French, A. P. // Physics in Perspective; 1999, Vol. 1 Issue 1, p3 

    Physics has seldom had to deal with claims of alteration or fabrication of data, such as have troubled biological and medical research in recent years. The case of Emil Rupp in the 1930s was, however, a notable exception. The present paper revisits this case, adding in certain areas to earlier...

  • Perceptions of Research Misconduct and an Analysis of Their Correlates.
    Braxton, John M.; Bayer, Alan E. // Journal of Higher Education; May/Jun94, Vol. 65 Issue 3, p351 

    Presents the result of the research that identified five patterns of attitudes and beliefs individual biochemists hold toward taking action for scientific wrongdoing. Factors that contribute to the shaping of attitudes and beliefs; Influence of individual achievement characteristics and...

  • Fraud squad files report to prosecutor in Inserm case.
    Butler, Declan // Nature; 7/23/1998, Vol. 394 Issue 6691, p308 

    Reports the possibility of another investigation into fraud at the Laboratory of Nutrition, Lipoprotein Metabolism and Atherosclerosis at the University of Rennes 1, France. Laboratory headed by Bernard Bihain; Decision whether to launch a judicial inquiry; Possible patent fraud; Details about...

  • International recruitment highlights need to track scientific behaviour.
    Dalton, Rex // Nature; 9/12/1996, Vol. 383 Issue 6596, p107 

    Discusses the phenomenon of scientists leaving the United States under suspicions of misconduct and moving into research posts in Europe. The lack of communication between institutions about fraud problems; The need to obtain clear information on the history of an applicant; Kimon J. Angelides'...

  • Fraud and deceit in science.
    Schraffordt Koops, Steven // International Urogynecology Journal; Jul2012, Vol. 23 Issue 7, p809 

    The author discusses issues related to fraud and deceit in science. He states that scientists commit fraud because they are under pressure to publish. He mentions that there is no excuse for scientific fraud and editors of journals need to be strict even for small violations. He adds that change...

  • Dating in doubt as research is probed.
    Dalton, Rex // Nature; 3/19/1998, Vol. 392 Issue 6673, p218 

    Reports that Arizona State University geographer Ronald I. Dorn is under investigation for possible scientific misconduct, as of March 19, 1998. Questions about the dating of rock varnish; Background of investigation; Interest in Dorn's methods; Dorn's research on petroglyphs in the petrified...

  • New doubts over rock-dating techniques.
    Dalton, Rex // Nature; 7/2/1998, Vol. 394 Issue 6688, p6 

    Explains that the rock-dating techniques of Arizona State University geographer Ronald I. Dorn have been called into question. Criticism of Dorn in `Science'; Dorn's rebuttal to the `Science' article; Questions about rock varnish samples taken from a Yucca Mountain site in Nevada; Dorn's...

  • The policing of science.
    Goodman, Neville W. // Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine; Jun2004, Vol. 97 Issue 6, p259 

    The author reflects on the occurrence of research fraud in Great Britain. He says that he was not convinced if trainees who perform research in his institution is doing a formal research training. He suggests that research governance requires an institution to have in place systems to detect and...

  • Rising star crashes back to Earth.
    Abbott, Alison // Nature; 10/3/2002, Vol. 419 Issue 6906, p420 

    Reports on the career of condensed-matter physicist Jan Hendrik Schon who was discovered to have committed scientific fraud in his published works. Development of semiconductor systems for use as solar cells; Offering of a permanent position at Bell Laboratories; Sanctions for misuse of funds.

  • Burdens of proof of misconduct.
    Abbott, Alison // Nature; 4/4/1996, Vol. 380 Issue 6573, p367 

    Opinion. Agrees with the majority of European countries who are skeptical of the need for federal agencies to address scientific fraud and misconduct. The contention that the scientific community's procedures of self regulation need to be scrutinized; Reasons, including expense, that federal...

  • LOOKING FOR THE GOOD STORIES.
    Bricklin, Mark // Prevention; Sep89, Vol. 41 Issue 9, p144 

    Discusses the reason why some articles are not published in the "Prevention" magazine. Importance of scientific evidence and studies to back up articles; Failure of Kirlian photography, ginseng and olive oil to prove its desired benefit.

  • Oh, Donna!
    Price, David Andrew // American Spectator; Jan1994, Vol. 27 Issue 1, p31 

    Presents evidence alleging science fraud and stolen research against Secretary of Health and Human Services Donna Shalala committed during her tenure as chancellor of the University of Wisconsin. Shalala's involvement on the case of professor Hector DeLuca and the patent on making a Vitamin D...

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