Citations with the tag: EMERSON, Ralph Waldo, 1803-1882

Results 101 - 150

  • THE HUMBLE-BEE.
     // Chief American Poets; 1905, p63 

    The poem "The Humble-Bee" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: Burly, dozing humble-bee, Last Line: Thy sleep makes ridiculous.

  • URIEL.
     // Chief American Poets; 1905, p64 

    The poem "Uriel" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: It fell in the ancient periods; Last Line: And the gods shook, they knew not why.

  • THE PROBLEM.
     // Chief American Poets; 1905, p64 

    The poem "The Problem" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: I Like a Church; I Like a cowl; Last Line: I would not the good bishop be.

  • WRITTEN IN A VOLUME OF GOETHE.
     // Chief American Poets; 1905, p65 

    The poem "Written in a Volume of Goethe" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: Six thankful weeks,-and let it be; Last Line: In his plenty things so rare?

  • WOODNOTES I.
     // Chief American Poets; 1905, p66 

    The poem "Woodnotes" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: When the pine tosses its cones; Last Line: The Clay of their departed lover.

  • WOODNOTES II.
     // Chief American Poets; 1905, p67 

    The poem "Woodnotes" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: 'Whether is better, the gift or the donor? Last Line: Than all it holds more deep, more high.'

  • THE SPHINX.
     // Chief American Poets; 1905, p71 

    The poem "Sphinx" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: The Sphinx is drowsy, Last Line: Is master of all I am.'

  • THE SNOW-STORM.
     // Chief American Poets; 1905, p72 

    The poem "The Snow-Storm" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: Announced by all the trumpets of the sky, Last Line: The frolic architecture of the snow.

  • FABLE.
     // Chief American Poets; 1905, p73 

    The poem "Fable" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: The mountain and the squirrel; Last Line: Neither can you crack a nut.'

  • THE INFORMING SPIRIT.
     // Chief American Poets; 1905, p73 

    The poem "The Informing Spirit" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: There is no great and no small; Last Line: Of Lord Christ's heart, and Shakspeare's.

  • FRIENDSHIP.
     // Chief American Poets; 1905, p73 

    The poem "Friendship" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. A Ruddy drop of manly blood; Are through thy friendship fair.

  • FORBEARANCE.
     // Chief American Poets; 1905, p73 

    The poem "Forbearance" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: Hast thou named all the birds without a; Last Line: thine!

  • HOLIDAYS.
     // Chief American Poets; 1905, p73 

    The poem "Holidays" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: From fall to spring, the russet acorn, Last Line: 'T is the turning of the tide.

  • SAADI.
     // Chief American Poets; 1905, p74 

    The poem "Saadi" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: Trees in groves, Last Line: Plied for thee thy households tasks.'

  • ODE TO BEAUTY.
     // Chief American Poets; 1905, p76 

    The poem "Ode to Beauty" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: Who gave thee, O Beauty, Last Line: Unmake me quite, or give thyself to me!

  • NATURE.
     // Chief American Poets; 1905, p77 

    The poem "Nature" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: The rounded world is fair to see, Last Line: And hints the future which it owns.

  • EXPERIENCE.
     // Chief American Poets; 1905, p77 

    The poem "Experience" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: The lords of life, the lords of life, Last Line: The founder thou; these are thy race!'

  • THRENODY.
     // Chief American Poets; 1905, p77 

    The poem "Threnody" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: The South-wond brings; Last Line: Lost in God, in Godhead found.'

  • TO J. W.
     // Chief American Poets; 1905, p80 

    The poem "To J.W." by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: Set not thy foot on graves; Last Line: God speed the mark!

  • ODE.
     // Chief American Poets; 1905, p80 

    The poem "Ode" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: Through loath to grieve; Last Line: side.

  • MERLIN.
     // Chief American Poets; 1905, p81 

    The poem "Merlin" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: Thy trivial harp will never please; Last Line: what they conceal.

  • HAMATREYA.
     // Chief American Poets; 1905, p83 

    The poem "Hamatreya" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: Bulkeley, Hunt, williard, Hosmer, Meriam; Last Line: Like lust in the chill of the grave.

  • FORERUNNERS.
     // Chief American Poets; 1905, p84 

    The poem "Forerunners" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: Long I followed happy guides, Last Line: Peace that hallows rudest ways.

  • GIVE ALL TO LOVE.
     // Chief American Poets; 1905, p85 

    The poem "Give All to Love" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: Give all to Love; Last Line: The gods arrive.

  • THE DAY'S RATION.
     // Chief American Poets; 1905, p85 

    The poem "The Day's Ration" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: When I was born; Last Line: The nearest matters for a thousand days?

  • MEROPS.
     // Chief American Poets; 1905, p86 

    The poem "Merops" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: What care I, so they stand the same, Last Line: One word, no more, to say.

  • MUSKETAQUID.
     // Chief American Poets; 1905, p86 

    The poem "Musketaquid" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: Because I was content with these poor; Last Line: Yet envies none, none are unenviable.'

  • NATURE.
     // Chief American Poets; 1905, p87 

    The poem "Nature" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: A subtle chain of countless rings; Last Line: Mounts through all the spires of form.

  • DAYS.
     // Chief American Poets; 1905, p87 

    The poem "Days" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: Daughters of time, the hypocritic days, Last Line: Under her solemn fillet saw the scorn.

  • TWO RIVERS.
     // Chief American Poets; 1905, p87 

    The poem "Two Rivers" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: Thy summer voice, Musketaquit, Last Line: And ages drop in it like rain.

  • BRAHMA.
     // Chief American Poets; 1905, p88 

    The poem "Brahma" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: if the red slayer think he slays, Last Line: Find me, and turn back thy back on heaven.

  • ODE.
     // Chief American Poets; 1905, p88 

    The poem "Ode" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: O tenderly the haughty day; Last Line: Ere freedom out of man.

  • SEASHORE.
     // Chief American Poets; 1905, p89 

    The poem "Seashore" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: I heard or seemed to hear the chiding Sea; Last Line: To distant men, who must go there, or die.

  • WALDEINSAMKEIT.
     // Chief American Poets; 1905, p90 

    The poem "Waldeinsamkeit" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: I do not count the hours I spend; Last Line: Crowns all thy mean affairs.

  • FRAGMENTS ON NATURE AND LIFE.
     // Chief American Poets; 1905, p90 

    The poem "Fragments on Nature and Life" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: daily the bending skies solicit man, Last Line: Time hath his work to do and we have ours.

  • QUATRAINS AND TRANSLATIONS.
     // Chief American Poets; 1905, p94 

    The poem "Quatrains and Translations" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: Ever the poet from the land; Last Line: I talk with kings the while.

  • THE BOHEMIAN HYMN.
     // Chief American Poets; 1905, p96 

    The poem "The Bohemian Hymn" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: In many forms we try; Last Line: Nor hymn, nor prayer, nor church.

  • PAN.
     // Chief American Poets; 1905, p96 

    The poem "Pan" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: O what are heroes, prophets, men. Last Line: Races and planets, its enchanted foam.

  • THE ENCHANTER.
     // Chief American Poets; 1905, p96 

    The poem "The Enchanter" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: In the deep heart of man a poet dwells; last Line: And gives persuasion to a gentle deed.

  • EROS.
     // Chief American Poets; 1905, p96 

    The poem "Eros" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: They put their finger on their lip, Last Line: They love, but name not love.

  • MUSIC.
     // Chief American Poets; 1905, p96 

    The poem "Music" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: Let me go where'er I will, Last Line: There alway, alway, something sings.

  • THE TITMOUSE.
     // Chief American Poets; 1905, p96 

    The poem "The Titmouse" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: You shall not be overbold; Last Line: Pæan! Veni, vidi, vici.

  • BOSTON HYMN.
     // Chief American Poets; 1905, p98 

    The poem "Boston Hymn" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: The word of the Lord by night; Last Line: His way home to the mark.

  • VOLUNTARIES.
     // Chief American Poets; 1905, p99 

    The poem "Voluntaries" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: Low and mournful be the strain, Last Line: All the ghosts beside.

  • MY GARDEN.
     // Chief American Poets; 1905, p100 

    The poem "My Garden" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: If I could put my woods in song; Last Line: He will spell in the sculpture, 'Stay.'

  • TERMINUS.
     // Chief American Poets; 1905, p101 

    The poem "Terminus" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: It is tine to be old, Last Line: and every wave is charmed.

  • RALPH WALDO EMERSON.
     // Chief American Poets; 1905, p663 

    A biography of American poet Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. He was born on May 25, 1803, in Boston, Massachusetts, and studied at Harvard University. In 1829, he was appointed as assistant pastor of the Hanover Street Church, Boston, and he gave up his pastorate in 1832. Emerson's most...

  • Concord Hymn.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Golden Treasury of American Songs & Lyrics; 1/1/1901, p31 

    Presents the poem "Concord Hymn," by Ralph Waldo Emerson. First Line: By the rude bridge that arched the flood, Last Line: The shaft we raise to them and thee.

  • Days.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Golden Treasury of American Songs & Lyrics; 1/1/1901, p48 

    Presents the poem "Days," by Ralph Waldo Emerson. First Line: Daughters of Time, the hypocritic Days, Last Line: Under her solemn fillet saw the scorn.

  • The Rhodora.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Golden Treasury of American Songs & Lyrics; 1/1/1901, p62 

    Presents the poem "The Rhodora," by Ralph Waldo Emerson. First Line: In May, when sea-winds pierced our solitudes, Last Line: The self-same Power that brought me there brought you.

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