Citations with the tag: EMERSON, Ralph Waldo, 1803-1882

Results 101 - 150

  • Fable.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // It Can Be Done: Poems of Inspiration; 1/1/1921, p144 

    Presents the poem "Fable," by Ralph Waldo Emerson. First Line: The mountain and the squirrel; Last Line: Neither can you crack a nut."

  • Ralph Waldo Emerson...Author.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Monkeyshines on America; Oct99 Massachusetts Issue, Part 2, p24 

    Profiles Ralph Waldo Emerson, a writer from Boston, Massachusetts. Educational background; Referral to Emerson as the 'Father of Transcendentalism.'

  • BRAHMA.
    EMERSON, RALPH WALDO // World's Best Poetry, Volume 4, The Higher Life; 1/1/1904, p6 

    The poem "Brahma," by Ralph Waldo Emerson, is presented. First Line: If the red slayer think he slays, Last Line: Find me, and turn thy back on heaven.

  • GOOD-BYE.
    EMERSON, RALPH WALDO // World's Best Poetry, Volume 4, The Higher Life; 1/1/1904, p20 

    The poem "Good-Bye," by Ralph Waldo Emerson, is presented. First Line: Good-bye, proud world, I'm going home: Last Line: When man in the bush with God may meet?

  • AMAZING, BEAUTEOUS CHANGE!
    DODDRIDGE, PHILIP // World's Best Poetry, Volume 4, The Higher Life; 1/1/1904, p123 

    The poem "Amazing, Beauteous Change!," by Ralph Waldo Emerson, is presented. First Line: Amazing, beauteous change! Last Line: Of ardent praise.

  • THE PROBLEM.
    EMERSON, RALPH WALDO // World's Best Poetry, Volume 4, The Higher Life; 1/1/1904, p136 

    The poem "The Problem," by Ralph Waldo Emerson, is presented. First Line: I like a church; I like a cowl; Last Line: I would not the good bishop be.

  • Stainless soldier on the walls.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Poems with Power to Strengthen the Soul; 1/1/1907, p22 

    The poem "Stainless Soldier on the Walls" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: Stainless soldier on the walls, Last Line: Victor over death and pain.

  • The hero is not fed on sweets.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Poems with Power to Strengthen the Soul; 1/1/1907, p37 

    The poem "The Hero Is Not Fed on Sweets" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: The hero is not fed on sweets, Last Line: And head winds right for royal sails.

  • FORBEARANCE.
    Emerson // Ontario Readers, Fourth Book; 1/1/1909, p59 

    The poem "Forbearance," by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: Hast thou named all the birds without a gun? Last Line: O, be my friend, and teach me to be thine!

  • The Titmouse.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Posy Ring: A Book of Verse for Children; 1/1/1903, p56 

    The poem "The Titmouse," by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: … . Piped a tiny voice hard by, Last Line: Fronts the north wind in waistcoat gray.

  • Fable.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Posy Ring: A Book of Verse for Children; 1/1/1903, p163 

    The poem "Fable," by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: The mountain and the squirrel; Last Line: Neither can you crack a nut!"

  • HYMN ON THE FIGHT AT CONCORD.
    Emerson, R. W. // Graded Memory Selections; 1/1/1903, p99 

    The poem "Hymn on the Fight at Concord" by R. W. Emerson is presented. First Line: By the rude bridge that arched the flood, Last Line: The shaft we raise to them and thee.

  • April and May.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Golden Numbers: A Book of Verse for Youth; 1/1/1909, p19 

    The poem "April and May" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: April cold with dropping rain; Last Line: Flows from the heart of Love, the Lord.

  • Concord Hymn.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Golden Numbers: A Book of Verse for Youth; 1/1/1909, p85 

    The poem "Concord Hymn" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: By the rude bridge that arched the flood, Last Line: The shaft we raise to them and thee.

  • Ode.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Golden Numbers: A Book of Verse for Youth; 1/1/1909, p86 

    The poem "Ode" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: O tenderly the haughty day; Last Line: Ere freedom out of man.

  • The Snow Storm.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Golden Numbers: A Book of Verse for Youth; 1/1/1909, p192 

    The poem "The Snow Storm" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: Announced by all the trumpets of the sky, Last Line: The frolic architecture of the snow.

  • Forbearance.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Golden Numbers: A Book of Verse for Youth; 1/1/1909, p221 

    The poem "Forbearance" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: Hast thou named all the birds without a gun? Last Line: O, be my friend, and teach me to be thine!

  • Duty.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Golden Numbers: A Book of Verse for Youth; 1/1/1909, p223 

    The poem "Duty" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: So nigh is grandeur to our dust, Last Line: The youth replies, "I can."

  • The Rhodora.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Golden Numbers: A Book of Verse for Youth; 1/1/1909, p295 

    The poem "The Rhodora" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: In May, when sea-winds pierced our solitudes, Last Line: The selfsame Power that brought me there, brought you.

  • The Humble-Bee.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Golden Numbers: A Book of Verse for Youth; 1/1/1909, p327 

    The poem "The Humble-Bee" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: Burly, dozing humble-bee, Last Line: Thy sleep makes ridiculous.

  • THE SNOWSTORM.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Children's Second Book of Poetry; 1915, p104 

    The poem "The Snowstorm," by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: ANNOUNCED by all the trumpets of the sky, Last Line: In a tumultuous privacy of storm.

  • Concord Hymn.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Golden Treasury of American Songs & Lyrics; 1/1/1901, p31 

    Presents the poem "Concord Hymn," by Ralph Waldo Emerson. First Line: By the rude bridge that arched the flood, Last Line: The shaft we raise to them and thee.

  • Days.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Golden Treasury of American Songs & Lyrics; 1/1/1901, p48 

    Presents the poem "Days," by Ralph Waldo Emerson. First Line: Daughters of Time, the hypocritic Days, Last Line: Under her solemn fillet saw the scorn.

  • The Rhodora.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Golden Treasury of American Songs & Lyrics; 1/1/1901, p62 

    Presents the poem "The Rhodora," by Ralph Waldo Emerson. First Line: In May, when sea-winds pierced our solitudes, Last Line: The self-same Power that brought me there brought you.

  • The Humble-bee.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Golden Treasury of American Songs & Lyrics; 1/1/1901, p64 

    Presents the poem "The Humble-bee," by Ralph Waldo Emerson. First Line: Burly, dozing humble-bee, Last Line: Thy sleep makes ridiculous.

  • from "Woodnotes."
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Graded Poetry: Seventh Year; 1/1/1906, p31 

    Presents an untitled poem excerpted from "Woodnotes," by Ralph Waldo Emerson. First Line: 'Twas one of the charméd days; Last Line: The clay of their departed lover."

  • CONCORD HYMN.
    EMERSON, RALPH WALDO // Children's Third Book of Poetry; 1915, p200 

    The poem "Concord Hymn," by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: BY the rude bridge that arched the flood, Last Line: The shaft we raise to them and thee.

  • ABRAHAM LINCOLN.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Our American Holidays: Lincoln's Birthday: A Comprehensive View ; 1/ 1/1909, p26 

    The article presents a speech by politician Ralph Waldo Emerson delivered at the at the funeral services for U.S. President Abraham Emerson held in Concord, Massachusetts.

  • Good-bye.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Selections from American Poetry, with Special Reference to Poe, ; 1/1/1917, p112 

    Presents the poem "Good-bye," by Ralph Waldo Emerson. First Line: Good-bye, proud world! I'm going home; Last Line: Where man in the bush with God may meet?

  • Each and All.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Selections from American Poetry, with Special Reference to Poe, ; 1/1/1917, p112 

    Presents the poem "Each and All," by Ralph Waldo Emerson. First Line: Little thinks, in the field, yon red-cloaked clown; Last Line: I yielded myself to the perfect whole.

  • The Problem.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Selections from American Poetry, with Special Reference to Poe, ; 1/1/1917, p113 

    Presents the poem "The Problem," by Ralph Waldo Emerson. First Line: I like a church; I like a cowl; Last Line: I would not the good bishop be.

  • The Rhodora.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Selections from American Poetry, with Special Reference to Poe, ; 1/1/1917, p114 

    Presents the poem "The Rhodora," by Ralph Waldo Emerson. First Line: In May, when sea-winds pierced our solitudes, Last Line: The self-same Power that brought me there brought you.

  • The Humble-Bee.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Selections from American Poetry, with Special Reference to Poe, ; 1/1/1917, p115 

    Presents the poem "The Humble-Bee," by Ralph Waldo Emerson. First Line: Burly, dozing humble-bee, Last Line: Thy sleep makes ridiculous.

  • The Snow-Storm.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Selections from American Poetry, with Special Reference to Poe, ; 1/1/1917, p116 

    Presents the poem "The Snow-Storm," by Ralph Waldo Emerson. First Line: Announced by all the trumpets of the sky, Last Line: The frolic architecture of the snow.

  • Fable.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Selections from American Poetry, with Special Reference to Poe, ; 1/1/1917, p116 

    Presents the poem "Fable," by Ralph Waldo Emerson. First Line: The mountain and the squirrel; Last Line: Neither can you crack a nut."

  • Forbearance.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Selections from American Poetry, with Special Reference to Poe, ; 1/1/1917, p117 

    Presents the poem "Forbearance," by Ralph Waldo Emerson. First Line: Hast thou named all the birds without a gun? Last Line: O, be my friend, and teach me to be thine!

  • Concord Hymn.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Selections from American Poetry, with Special Reference to Poe, ; 1/1/1917, p117 

    Presents the poem "Concord Hymn," by Ralph Waldo Emerson. First Line: By the rude bridge that arched the flood, Last Line: The shaft we raise to them and thee.

  • Boston Hymn.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Selections from American Poetry, with Special Reference to Poe, ; 1/1/1917, p117 

    Presents the poem "Boston Hymn," by Ralph Waldo Emerson. First Line: The word of the Lord by night; Last Line: His way home to the mark.

  • The Titmouse.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Selections from American Poetry, with Special Reference to Poe, ; 1/1/1917, p119 

    Presents the poem "The Titmouse," by Ralph Waldo Emerson. First Line: You shall not be overbold; Last Line: Paean! Veni, vidi, vici.

  • The Problem.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Oxford Book of English Mystical Verse; 1917, p137 

    The poem "The Problem," by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: I like a church; I like a cowl; Last Line: I would not the good bishop be.

  • Ode to Beauty.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Oxford Book of English Mystical Verse; 1917, p139 

    The poem "Ode to Beauty," by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: Who gave thee, O Beauty, Last Line: Unmake me quiet, or give thyself to me!

  • Brahma.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Oxford Book of English Mystical Verse; 1917, p142 

    The poem "Brahma," by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: If the red slayer think he slays, Last Line: Find me and turn thy back on heaven.

  • Worship.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Oxford Book of English Mystical Verse; 1917, p143 

    The poem "Worship," by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: This is he, who, felled by foes, Last Line: Which is human, which divine.

  • Wood-notes.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Oxford Book of Victorian Verse; 1919, p100 

    The poem "Wood-Notes" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: Whoso walks in solitude; Last Line: Tho' thou lie alone on the ground!

  • Fore-runners.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Oxford Book of Victorian Verse; 1919, p101 

    The poem "Forerunners" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: Long I follow'd happy guides, Last Line: Peace that hallows rudest ways.

  • Days.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Oxford Book of Victorian Verse; 1919, p102 

    The poem "Days" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: Daughter of Time; the hypocritic Days, Last Line: Under her solemn fillet saw the scorn.

  • Give All to Love.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Oxford Book of Victorian Verse; 1919, p103 

    The poem "Give All to Love" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: Give All to Love; Last Line: The gods arrive.

  • Brabma.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Oxford Book of Victorian Verse; 1919, p104 

    The poem "Brahma" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: If the red slayer think he slays, Last Line: Find me, and turn thy back on heaven.

  • From Nature.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Hutchinson Literary Extracts; 2007, p1 

    The article presents an excerpt from "Nature," by Ralph Waldo Emerson.

  • From 'Experience.'.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Hutchinson Literary Extracts; 2007, p1 

    The article presents an excerpt from the essay "Experience," by Ralph Waldo Emerson.

Previous 50 Results Next 50 Results
Share

Other Topics