Citations with the tag: EMERSON, Ralph Waldo, 1803-1882

Results 101 - 150

  • Brahma.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Oxford Book of English Mystical Verse; 1917, p142 

    The poem "Brahma," by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: If the red slayer think he slays, Last Line: Find me and turn thy back on heaven.

  • Worship.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Oxford Book of English Mystical Verse; 1917, p143 

    The poem "Worship," by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: This is he, who, felled by foes, Last Line: Which is human, which divine.

  • ABRAHAM LINCOLN.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Our American Holidays: Lincoln's Birthday: A Comprehensive View ; 1/ 1/1909, p26 

    The article presents a speech by politician Ralph Waldo Emerson delivered at the at the funeral services for U.S. President Abraham Emerson held in Concord, Massachusetts.

  • Commencement Oratory.
    Campbell, Sally // American Heritage; Nov87, Vol. 38 Issue 7, p8 

    Presents a letter to the editor in response to the article "The Time Machine," in the July/August issue about the commencement address made by Ralph Waldo Emerson.

  • BOOKS.
    Updike, John // New Yorker; 6/4/84, Vol. 60 Issue 11, p112 

    Comments on the books written by poet Ralph Waldo Emerson. Emphasis on the essays of Emerson; Influence of the essays Emerson on authors; Concept of Emerson on idealism as discussed on the book "Nature".

  • from "Woodnotes."
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Graded Poetry: Seventh Year; 1/1/1906, p31 

    Presents an untitled poem excerpted from "Woodnotes," by Ralph Waldo Emerson. First Line: 'Twas one of the charméd days; Last Line: The clay of their departed lover."

  • Each and All.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Selections from American Poetry, with Special Reference to Poe, ; 1/1/1917, p112 

    Presents the poem "Each and All," by Ralph Waldo Emerson. First Line: Little thinks, in the field, yon red-cloaked clown; Last Line: I yielded myself to the perfect whole.

  • The Problem.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Selections from American Poetry, with Special Reference to Poe, ; 1/1/1917, p113 

    Presents the poem "The Problem," by Ralph Waldo Emerson. First Line: I like a church; I like a cowl; Last Line: I would not the good bishop be.

  • The Rhodora.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Selections from American Poetry, with Special Reference to Poe, ; 1/1/1917, p114 

    Presents the poem "The Rhodora," by Ralph Waldo Emerson. First Line: In May, when sea-winds pierced our solitudes, Last Line: The self-same Power that brought me there brought you.

  • Fable.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Selections from American Poetry, with Special Reference to Poe, ; 1/1/1917, p116 

    Presents the poem "Fable," by Ralph Waldo Emerson. First Line: The mountain and the squirrel; Last Line: Neither can you crack a nut."

  • Forbearance.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Selections from American Poetry, with Special Reference to Poe, ; 1/1/1917, p117 

    Presents the poem "Forbearance," by Ralph Waldo Emerson. First Line: Hast thou named all the birds without a gun? Last Line: O, be my friend, and teach me to be thine!

  • Concord Hymn.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Selections from American Poetry, with Special Reference to Poe, ; 1/1/1917, p117 

    Presents the poem "Concord Hymn," by Ralph Waldo Emerson. First Line: By the rude bridge that arched the flood, Last Line: The shaft we raise to them and thee.

  • The Titmouse.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Selections from American Poetry, with Special Reference to Poe, ; 1/1/1917, p119 

    Presents the poem "The Titmouse," by Ralph Waldo Emerson. First Line: You shall not be overbold; Last Line: Paean! Veni, vidi, vici.

  • From Nature.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Hutchinson Literary Extracts; 2007, p1 

    The article presents an excerpt from "Nature," by Ralph Waldo Emerson.

  • From 'Experience.'.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Hutchinson Literary Extracts; 2007, p1 

    The article presents an excerpt from the essay "Experience," by Ralph Waldo Emerson.

  • A Letter.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Collected Classic Poems, Coleridge to Gascoigne; 2012, p1 

    The poem "A Letter" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: Dear brother, would you know the life; Last Line: And aim a telescope at the inviolate Sun.

  • Bacchus.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Collected Classic Poems, Coleridge to Gascoigne; 2012, p1 

    The poem "Bacchus" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: Bring me wine, but wine which never grew; Last Line: The dancing Pleiads and eternal men.

  • Blight.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Collected Classic Poems, Coleridge to Gascoigne; 2012, p1 

    The poem "Blight" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: Give me truths; Last Line: Of the toy's purchase with the length of life.

  • Boston Hymn.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Collected Classic Poems, Coleridge to Gascoigne; 2012, p1 

    The poem "Boston Hymn" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: The word of the Lord by night; Last Line: His way home to the mark.

  • Boston.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Collected Classic Poems, Coleridge to Gascoigne; 2012, p1 

    The poem "Boston" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: The rocky nook with hill-tops three; Last Line: Or union nevermore again.

  • Brahma.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Collected Classic Poems, Coleridge to Gascoigne; 2012, p1 

    The poem "Brahma" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: If the red slayer think he slays, Last Line: Find me, and turn thy back on heaven.

  • Character.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Collected Classic Poems, Coleridge to Gascoigne; 2012, p1 

    The poem "Character" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: The sun set, but set not his hope: Last Line: As hid all measure of the feat.

  • Days.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Collected Classic Poems, Coleridge to Gascoigne; 2012, p1 

    The poem "Days" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: Daughters of Time, the hypocritic Days, Last Line: Under her solemn fillet saw the scorn.

  • Each and All.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Collected Classic Poems, Coleridge to Gascoigne; 2012, p1 

    The poem "Each and All" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: Little thinks, in the field, yon red-cloaked clown; Last Line: I yielded myself to the perfect whole.

  • Eros.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Collected Classic Poems, Coleridge to Gascoigne; 2012, p1 

    The poem "Eros" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: The sense of the world is short, Last Line: 'Tis not to be improved.

  • Experience.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Collected Classic Poems, Coleridge to Gascoigne; 2012, p1 

    The poem "Experience" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: The lords of life, the lords of life, Last Line: The founder thou; these are thy race!'

  • Fable.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Collected Classic Poems, Coleridge to Gascoigne; 2012, p1 

    The poem "Fable" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: The mountain and the squirrel; Last Line: Neither can you crack a nut.'

  • Fate.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Collected Classic Poems, Coleridge to Gascoigne; 2012, p1 

    The poem "Fate" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: Deep in the man sits fast his fate; Last Line: Is the same Genius that creates.

  • Forbearance.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Collected Classic Poems, Coleridge to Gascoigne; 2012, p1 

    The poem "Forbearance" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: Hast thou named all the birds without a gun? Last Line: O, be my friend, and teach me to be thine!

  • Forerunners.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Collected Classic Poems, Coleridge to Gascoigne; 2012, p1 

    The poem "Forerunners" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: Long I followed happy guides, Last Line: Peace that hallows rudest ways.

  • Freedom.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Collected Classic Poems, Coleridge to Gascoigne; 2012, p1 

    The poem "Freedom" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: Once I wished I might rehearse; Last Line: Right thou feelest, rush to do.'

  • Friendship.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Collected Classic Poems, Coleridge to Gascoigne; 2012, p1 

    The poem "Friendship" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: A ruddy drop of manly blood; Last Line: Are through thy friendship fair.

  • Grace.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Collected Classic Poems, Coleridge to Gascoigne; 2012, p1 

    The poem "Grace" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: How much, Preventing God! how much I owe; Last Line: Had not these me against myself defended.

  • Intellect.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Collected Classic Poems, Coleridge to Gascoigne; 2012, p1 

    The poem "Intellect" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: Rule which by obeying grows; Last Line: Makes him to his own blood strange.

  • Limits.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Collected Classic Poems, Coleridge to Gascoigne; 2012, p1 

    The poem "Limits" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: Who knows this or that? Last Line: Is cruelty to thy cruelty.

  • Merops.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Collected Classic Poems, Coleridge to Gascoigne; 2012, p1 

    The poem "Merops" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: What care I, so they stand the same,- Last Line: One word, no more, to say.

  • Mithridates.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Collected Classic Poems, Coleridge to Gascoigne; 2012, p1 

    The poem "Mithridates" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: I cannot spare water or wine, Last Line: But sun me in the Capitol.

  • Music.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Collected Classic Poems, Coleridge to Gascoigne; 2012, p1 

    The poem "Music" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: Let me go where'er I will; Last Line: There alway, alway something sings.

  • Musketaquid.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Collected Classic Poems, Coleridge to Gascoigne; 2012, p1 

    The poem "Musketaquid" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: Because I was content with these poor fields, Last Line: Yet envies none, none are unenviable."

  • Sacrifice.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Collected Classic Poems, Coleridge to Gascoigne; 2012, p1 

    The poem "Sacrifice" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: Though love repine, and reason chafe, Last Line: When for the truth he ought to die.'

  • Seashore.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Collected Classic Poems, Coleridge to Gascoigne; 2012, p1 

    The poem "Seashore" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: Say, Pilgrim, why so late and slow to come? Last Line: To distant men, who must go there, or die.

  • Song of Nature.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Collected Classic Poems, Coleridge to Gascoigne; 2012, p1 

    The poem "Song of Nature," by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: Mine are the night and morning, Last Line: Gives back the bending heavens in dew.

  • Terminus.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Collected Classic Poems, Coleridge to Gascoigne; 2012, p1 

    The poem "Terminus," by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: It is time to be old, Last Line: And every wave is charmed."

  • The Poet.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Collected Classic Poems, Coleridge to Gascoigne; 2012, p1 

    The poem "The Poet," by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: Right upward on the road of fame; Last Line: Beauty and Force alight.

  • The Sphinx.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Collected Classic Poems, Coleridge to Gascoigne; 2012, p1 

    The poem "The Sphinx," by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: The Sphinx is drowsy, Last Line: Is master of all I am."

  • The Test.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Collected Classic Poems, Coleridge to Gascoigne; 2012, p1 

    The poem "The Test," by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: I hung my verses in the wind, Last Line: Which five hundred did survive?

  • The Visit.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Collected Classic Poems, Coleridge to Gascoigne; 2012, p1 

    The poem "The Visit," by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: Askest, "How long thou shalt stay?" Last Line: Hatred's swift repulsions play.

  • The Problem.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Collected Classic Poems, Coleridge to Gascoigne; 2012, p1 

    The poem "The Problem" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: I like a church; I like a cowl; Last Line: I would not the good bishop be.

  • The Rhodora.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Collected Classic Poems, Coleridge to Gascoigne; 2012, p1 

    The poem "The Rhodora" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: On being asked, Whence is the flower? Last Line: The self-same Power that brought me there brought you.

  • Threnody.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Collected Classic Poems, Coleridge to Gascoigne; 2012, p1 

    The poem "Threnody" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: The south-wind brings; and here must I remain, Last Line: Lost in God, in Godhead found."

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