Citations with the tag: EMERSON, Ralph Waldo, 1803-1882

Results 101 - 150

  • FABLE.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Book of Humorous Verse; 1/1/1936, p247 

    The poem "Fable," by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: The mountain and the squirrel; Last Line: Neither can you crack a nut."

  • Concord Hymn.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Golden Treasury of American Songs & Lyrics; 1/1/1901, p31 

    Presents the poem "Concord Hymn," by Ralph Waldo Emerson. First Line: By the rude bridge that arched the flood, Last Line: The shaft we raise to them and thee.

  • Days.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Golden Treasury of American Songs & Lyrics; 1/1/1901, p48 

    Presents the poem "Days," by Ralph Waldo Emerson. First Line: Daughters of Time, the hypocritic Days, Last Line: Under her solemn fillet saw the scorn.

  • The Rhodora.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Golden Treasury of American Songs & Lyrics; 1/1/1901, p62 

    Presents the poem "The Rhodora," by Ralph Waldo Emerson. First Line: In May, when sea-winds pierced our solitudes, Last Line: The self-same Power that brought me there brought you.

  • The Humble-bee.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Golden Treasury of American Songs & Lyrics; 1/1/1901, p64 

    Presents the poem "The Humble-bee," by Ralph Waldo Emerson. First Line: Burly, dozing humble-bee, Last Line: Thy sleep makes ridiculous.

  • from "Woodnotes."
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Graded Poetry: Seventh Year; 1/1/1906, p31 

    Presents an untitled poem excerpted from "Woodnotes," by Ralph Waldo Emerson. First Line: 'Twas one of the charméd days; Last Line: The clay of their departed lover."

  • GOOD-BYE.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Chief American Poets; 1905, p58 

    The poem "Good-Bye" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: Good-bye!, proud world! I'm going home: Last Line: When man in the bush with God may meet?

  • THOUGHT.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Chief American Poets; 1905, p58 

    The poem "Thought" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: I am not poor, but I am proud, Last Line: And mix with Deity.

  • THE RIVER.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Chief American Poets; 1905, p58 

    The poem "The River" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: and I beyond once more; Last Line: shade.

  • LINES TO ELLEN.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Chief American Poets; 1905, p59 

    The poem "Lines to Ellen" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: Tell me, maiden, dost thou use; Last Line: Or made what other purlieus proud.

  • TO ELLEN AT THE SOUTH.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Chief American Poets; 1905, p59 

    The poem "To Ellen at the South" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: The green grass is bowing, Last Line: Sings a tune that's worth the knowing.'

  • TO ELLEN.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Chief American Poets; 1905, p59 

    The poem "To Ellen" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: And Eellen, when the graybeard years; Last Line: And all but deathless Reason gone.

  • WRITTEN IN NAPLES.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Chief American Poets; 1905, p60 

    The poem "Written in Naples" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: We are what we made; each following; Last Line: Thine elegy, sweet singer, sainted wife.

  • WRITTEN AT ROME.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Chief American Poets; 1905, p60 

    The poem "Written at Rome" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: Alone in Rome. why, Rome is lonely; Last Line: pear.

  • WEBSTER.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Chief American Poets; 1905, p61 

    The poem "Webster" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: Ill fits the abstemious Muse a crown to; Last Line: prophecy.

  • THE RHODORA: ON BEING ASKED, WHENCE IS THE FLOWER?
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Chief American Poets; 1905, p61 

    The poem "The Rhodora" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: In May, when sea-winds pierced our solitudes, Last Line: brought you.

  • EACH AND ALL.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Chief American Poets; 1905, p61 

    The poem "Each and All" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: little thinks, in the field, yon red-claoked; Last Line: I yielded myself to the perfect whole.

  • THE APOLOGY.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Chief American Poets; 1905, p62 

    The poem "The Apology" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: Think me not unkind and rude; Last Line: which I gather in a song.

  • CONCORD HYMN.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Chief American Poets; 1905, p63 

    The poem "Concord Hymn" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: By the rude bridge that arched the flood, Last Line: The shaft we raise to them and thee.

  • THE HUMBLE-BEE.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Chief American Poets; 1905, p63 

    The poem "The Humble-Bee" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: Burly, dozing humble-bee, Last Line: Thy sleep makes ridiculous.

  • URIEL.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Chief American Poets; 1905, p64 

    The poem "Uriel" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: It fell in the ancient periods; Last Line: And the gods shook, they knew not why.

  • THE PROBLEM.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Chief American Poets; 1905, p64 

    The poem "The Problem" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: I Like a Church; I Like a cowl; Last Line: I would not the good bishop be.

  • WRITTEN IN A VOLUME OF GOETHE.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Chief American Poets; 1905, p65 

    The poem "Written in a Volume of Goethe" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: Six thankful weeks,-and let it be; Last Line: In his plenty things so rare?

  • WOODNOTES I.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Chief American Poets; 1905, p66 

    The poem "Woodnotes" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: When the pine tosses its cones; Last Line: The Clay of their departed lover.

  • WOODNOTES II.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Chief American Poets; 1905, p67 

    The poem "Woodnotes" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: 'Whether is better, the gift or the donor? Last Line: Than all it holds more deep, more high.'

  • THE SPHINX.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Chief American Poets; 1905, p71 

    The poem "Sphinx" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: The Sphinx is drowsy, Last Line: Is master of all I am.'

  • THE SNOW-STORM.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Chief American Poets; 1905, p72 

    The poem "The Snow-Storm" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: Announced by all the trumpets of the sky, Last Line: The frolic architecture of the snow.

  • FABLE.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Chief American Poets; 1905, p73 

    The poem "Fable" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: The mountain and the squirrel; Last Line: Neither can you crack a nut.'

  • THE INFORMING SPIRIT.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Chief American Poets; 1905, p73 

    The poem "The Informing Spirit" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: There is no great and no small; Last Line: Of Lord Christ's heart, and Shakspeare's.

  • FRIENDSHIP.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Chief American Poets; 1905, p73 

    The poem "Friendship" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. A Ruddy drop of manly blood; Are through thy friendship fair.

  • FORBEARANCE.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Chief American Poets; 1905, p73 

    The poem "Forbearance" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: Hast thou named all the birds without a; Last Line: thine!

  • HOLIDAYS.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Chief American Poets; 1905, p73 

    The poem "Holidays" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: From fall to spring, the russet acorn, Last Line: 'T is the turning of the tide.

  • SAADI.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Chief American Poets; 1905, p74 

    The poem "Saadi" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: Trees in groves, Last Line: Plied for thee thy households tasks.'

  • ODE TO BEAUTY.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Chief American Poets; 1905, p76 

    The poem "Ode to Beauty" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: Who gave thee, O Beauty, Last Line: Unmake me quite, or give thyself to me!

  • NATURE.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Chief American Poets; 1905, p77 

    The poem "Nature" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: The rounded world is fair to see, Last Line: And hints the future which it owns.

  • EXPERIENCE.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Chief American Poets; 1905, p77 

    The poem "Experience" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: The lords of life, the lords of life, Last Line: The founder thou; these are thy race!'

  • THRENODY.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Chief American Poets; 1905, p77 

    The poem "Threnody" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: The South-wond brings; Last Line: Lost in God, in Godhead found.'

  • TO J. W.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Chief American Poets; 1905, p80 

    The poem "To J.W." by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: Set not thy foot on graves; Last Line: God speed the mark!

  • ODE.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Chief American Poets; 1905, p80 

    The poem "Ode" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: Through loath to grieve; Last Line: side.

  • MERLIN.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Chief American Poets; 1905, p81 

    The poem "Merlin" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: Thy trivial harp will never please; Last Line: what they conceal.

  • HAMATREYA.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Chief American Poets; 1905, p83 

    The poem "Hamatreya" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: Bulkeley, Hunt, williard, Hosmer, Meriam; Last Line: Like lust in the chill of the grave.

  • FORERUNNERS.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Chief American Poets; 1905, p84 

    The poem "Forerunners" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: Long I followed happy guides, Last Line: Peace that hallows rudest ways.

  • GIVE ALL TO LOVE.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Chief American Poets; 1905, p85 

    The poem "Give All to Love" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: Give all to Love; Last Line: The gods arrive.

  • THE DAY'S RATION.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Chief American Poets; 1905, p85 

    The poem "The Day's Ration" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: When I was born; Last Line: The nearest matters for a thousand days?

  • MEROPS.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Chief American Poets; 1905, p86 

    The poem "Merops" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: What care I, so they stand the same, Last Line: One word, no more, to say.

  • MUSKETAQUID.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Chief American Poets; 1905, p86 

    The poem "Musketaquid" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: Because I was content with these poor; Last Line: Yet envies none, none are unenviable.'

  • NATURE.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Chief American Poets; 1905, p87 

    The poem "Nature" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: A subtle chain of countless rings; Last Line: Mounts through all the spires of form.

  • DAYS.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Chief American Poets; 1905, p87 

    The poem "Days" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: Daughters of time, the hypocritic days, Last Line: Under her solemn fillet saw the scorn.

  • TWO RIVERS.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Chief American Poets; 1905, p87 

    The poem "Two Rivers" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: Thy summer voice, Musketaquit, Last Line: And ages drop in it like rain.

  • BRAHMA.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo // Chief American Poets; 1905, p88 

    The poem "Brahma" by Ralph Waldo Emerson is presented. First Line: if the red slayer think he slays, Last Line: Find me, and turn back thy back on heaven.

Previous 50 Results Next 50 Results
Share

Other Topics