Citations with the tag: ALGONQUIAN Indians

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  • North Carolina Algonquian.
     // Northeast Indians; 1999, p1 

    Describes the settlements, organization, houses, food, clothing, tools and religion of the North Carolina Algonquian Indians.

  • Population structure of Algonquian speakers.
    Jantz, R.L.; Meadows, Lee // Human Biology; Jun95, Vol. 67 Issue 3, p375 

    Examines anthropometric differentiation among Algonquian-speaking populations from New Brunswick to Montana. Head, face and body dimensions; Distinctiveness of the Ojibwa located northwest of Lake Superior; Geographic distances and head and face dimensions; Language distances and anthropometric...

  • Index.
    Jantz, R.L.; Meadows, Lee // Praying People; 1998, Vol. 2, p267 

    A subject index for the book "Praying People" is presented.

  • Show What You Know.
    Jantz, R.L.; Meadows, Lee // Weekly Reader - Edition 2; Nov2010, Vol. 80, Special section p4 

    A quiz about the Wampanoag is presented.

  • Native peoples of the Northeast.
    Richmond, Trudie Lamb // Cobblestone; Nov94, Vol. 15 Issue 9, p2 

    Focuses on the native peoples of the Northeast United States. Iroquois and Algonquians, the two major linguistic groups when Europeans arrived; How they lived; What they ate; Longhouses; American Indian population of the Northeast based on the 1990 census. INSET: Word lore, by E. Barrie Kavasch.

  • Old Money.
    Leduc, Adrienne // Beaver; Aug/Sep2000, Vol. 80 Issue 4, p8 

    Focuses on the trading currencies introduced in colonial Canada. Beads crafted by the Algonquian tribes; Basis of the French monetary system; Amount of export tax paid by colonists; Effect of the decline of beaver pelt demand in the country; Actions taken by Jacques Demeulles to pay the wages of...

  • Monkey Reports.
    Leduc, Adrienne // Monkeyshines on America; Feb2001 Maine Issue, p8 

    Augusta, Maine's sixth-largest city, is the state's capital. The first residents of the area were members of two different tribes of Algonquin Indians which spent their summers there. The Indians called the site "Kouissnoc." In 1625, colonists from Plymouth, in Massachusetts, began trading with...

  • The Native Americans of Vermont.
    Leduc, Adrienne // Monkeyshines on America; Jan97 Vermont Issue, p13 

    Provides information on the Algonquians and Iroquois, major tribes that have inhabited Vermont before French and English colonies were established. Disputes between the two tribes; Indian nations within Iroquois tribe; Forms of entertainment of the tribes.

  • North Carolina (NC).
    Leduc, Adrienne // World Almanac & Book of Facts; 2009, p1492 

    An encyclopedia entry about the state of North Carolina is presented. Also known as the Tar Heel or Old North State, North Carolina is located in the South Atlantic state bounded by Virginia, South Carolina and Georgia and has a total area of 53,819 square miles. Its population of 9,061,032 as...

  • Untitled.
    Leduc, Adrienne // Mi'kmaw Concordat; 1997, p106 

    A variety of historical data that relate to articles that appeared in the January 1997 issue of "The Mi'kmaw Concordat" are presented.

  • Judge dismisses Northern Arapaho Tribe's suit.
    Leduc, Adrienne // Native American Times; 10/16/2009, Vol. 15 Issue 41, p3 

    The article discusses the dismissal of the case filed against the state of Wyoming and Fremont County by the Northern Arapaho Tribe. The lawsuit was discontinued due to lack of consent to participate from the U.S. Government and the Eastern Shoshone tribe. The Northern Arapaho Tribal Council...

  • The Praying Indians' Speeches as Texts of Massachusett Oral Culture.
    White, Craig // Early American Literature; Sep2003, Vol. 38 Issue 3, p437 

    Focuses on the field of interaction between the speech and writing created by the Praying Towns of the Algonqian Indian language group which prolonged and preserved the elements of the oral culture of Massachusetts. Thrie is a discussion on the Eliot Tracts which offer evidence of Algonqian...

  • How Algonquian prophecies, language and culture transformed the American way of life forever.
    Thunderhorse, Iron // Wild West; Jun2002, Vol. 15 Issue 1, p14 

    Describes the Algonquian Indians and their contribution to the way of life in the U.S. Origins of the Algonquian Indians; Information on the oral and graphic tradition of Algonquians including prophecy and culture; Description of their system of democracy and political ideals.

  • Indians in New Hampshire.
    Thunderhorse, Iron // Monkeyshines on America; Aug98 New Hampshire Issue, p18 

    Presents information about the Indians in New Hampshire. Way of life of the Algonkians; Tribes of the Iriquois and Mohawks; Warfare between the Algonkians, their Indian neighbors and the whites.

  • Quebec destinations celebrate identity.
    Petten, Cheryl // Windspeaker; Jun2001, Vol. 19 Issue 2, Guide to Indian Country p22 

    Focuses on Aboriginal tourism destinations in Sept-Îles, Quebec. Features on the Shaputuan Musée; Efforts of the museum for the increasing awareness of Innu culture and vistors; Availability of the museum.

  • Exhibition reviews.
    Hauptman, Laurence M. // Journal of American History; Dec92, Vol. 79 Issue 3, p1078 

    Reviews the permanent exhibition `As We Tell Our Stories: Living Traditions and the Algonkian Peoples of Indian New England,' a project opened 1991 at the Institute for American Studies, Curtis Road off Route 199, Washington.

  • THE BIG DEAL.
    GALEA, STEVE // Ontario Out of Doors; Apr2013, Vol. 45 Issue 3, p62 

    The article focuses on the Preliminary Draft of the Agreement in Principle (AIP) between the Algonquins of Ontario (AOO) and the federal and provincial governments of Ontario. The AIP concerns Algonquin rights in the settlement area, including the right to hunt wild animals, migratory birds,...

  • Algonquian Indians at Summer Camp (Book Review).
    Richards, Marily S.; Gerhardt, Lilian N. // School Library Journal; Sep77, Vol. 24 Issue 1, p100 

    Reviews the book 'Algonquian Indians at Summer Camp,' by June Behrens and Pauline Brower.

  • THE HISTORY AND PRACTICE OF SHELL TEMPERING IN THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC: A USEFUL BALANCE.
    Herbert, Joseph M. // Southeastern Archaeology; Winter2008, Vol. 27 Issue 2, p265 

    Middle Atlantic shell-tempered pottery emerges in primitive form in the Albemarle region of North Carolina as the flat-bottomed Currituck "beaker" ware and Water Lily type, possibly flourishing prior to A.D. 400. Classic shell tempering is first represented in the Mockley series, variously...

  • Was the Shawnee War Chief Blue Jacket a Caucasian?
    Rowland, Carolyn D.; Van Trees, R. V.; Taylor, Marc S.; Raymer, Michael L.; Krane, Dan E. // Ohio Journal of Science; Sep2006, Vol. 106 Issue 4, p126 

    Two distinctly different origins have been ascribed to the great Shawnee war chief Blue Jacket who played a pivotal role in the early history of southwestern Ohio. By one very popular account, he was a captured Caucasian who embraced the ways of the Shawnee and came to lead their warriors in a...

  • Chapter 1: Civilization, Democracy and Government.
    Rowland, Carolyn D.; Van Trees, R. V.; Taylor, Marc S.; Raymer, Michael L.; Krane, Dan E. // We Were Not the Savages: Collision Between European & Native Ame; 2000, p9 

    Chapter 1 of the book "We Were Not the Savages: Collision Between European and Native American Civilizations," by Daniel N. Paul is presented. It offers information on the Mi'kmaq civilization, democracy and government. Information is also presented on the national identity of the Mi'kmaq and...

  • Nikanikin�tmaqn.
    Battiste, Marie // Mi'kmaw Concordat; 1997, p13 

    The article presents brief information on the beginning of the Aboriginal people of Atlantic Canada, the M�kmaq. It is stated that on the other side of the Path of the Spirits, the Life Giver called Kis�kwl, originated the firstborn, the Sun, who was brought across the Milky Way to...

  • Breaking the way for new casino.
    Battiste, Marie // Grand Rapids Business Journal; 9/21/2009, Vol. 27 Issue 39, p1 

    The article reports on the launch of the Gun Lake Casino in Wayland Township, Michigan. The Gun Lake Tribe of Pottawatomi Indians held a groundbreaking ceremony to mark the launch of the casino. Members of the tribe who attended the event included John Shagonaby, chief executive officer of MBPI...

  • Chapter 1: Sweet Medicine: Founder of the Cheyenne Way of Life.
    McIntosh, Kenneth; McIntosh, Marsha // Cheyenne (1-59084-666-4); 2003, p10 

    The chapter recounts the life of Sweet Medicine, the founder of the Cheyenne way of life. Sweet Medicine's mother became pregnant with him after dreaming of a man telling her that because her family lived right, Sweet Root will visit her. When her time came to give birth, she went out into the...

  • Iroquoian Pottery at Lake Abitibi: A Case Study of the Relationship Between Hurons and Algonkians on the Canadian Shield.
    Guindon, Fran�ois // Canadian Journal of Archaeology; 2009, Vol. 33 Issue 1, p65 

    This work sheds new light on the problems of interpreting the historical and cultural aspects of Iroquoian-like pottery in the Canadian Shield. Within this region, the Lake Abitibi case is unusual because the archaeological sites of the area exhibit an unusually high frequency of Iroquoian-like...

  • THE THUNDERBIRD MOTIF IN NORTHEASTERN INDIAN ART.
    Lenik, Edward J. // Archaeology of Eastern North America; 2012, Vol. 40, p163 

    Thunderbird figures and images are found in American Indian art throughout Canada and the United States. In the legends of Algonkian and Iroquoian peoples of the Northeast region the thunderbird is a powerful and sacred spirit-being in the form of a giant eagle-like bird. It causes lightning,...

  • Court Upholds Award to Tribe.
    Lenik, Edward J. // Native American Law Digest; Jul2005, Vol. 15 Issue 7, p10 

    This article reports that an appeals court in Wisconsin has upheld a jury's award of $400,000 to the Mole Lake Band of Lake Superior Chippewa from its accounting firm Schenk. The court granted the award after problems in the 1990s prompted an embezzlement investigation that led to the casino...

  • The History of New York State.
    Withrow, Susan S. // Monkeyshines on America; Jun2002 New York Issue, Part 1, p6 

    The article presents the history of New York State. It states that about 3000 years ago, Indians settled in the New York area to hunt and fish. Before the arrival of Europeans, two Indian groups, the Algonquian and the Iroquois, inhabited the New York area. In 1594, the first European sailed...

  • Stories of Migration: The Anishinaabeg and Irish Immigrants in the Great Lakes Region.
    Keenan, Deirdre // History Workshop Journal; Oct2007, Vol. 64 Issue 1, p354 

    According to the Anishinaabek (Ojibwe, Potawatomi, Odawa), their migration from the eastern shores of North America to the Great Lakes region began with the knowledge that a light-skinned people would cross the great salt water and threaten their survival. My Irish ancestors were among the...

  • Big Bear Mistahimaskwa, a Hero Worth Commemorating.
    Wastasecoot, James // Canadian Dimension; Jan/Feb2007, Vol. 41 Issue 1, p52 

    The article profiles Big Bear Mistahimaskwa. Big Bear was a Plains Cree chief whose independence of mind and defiance against the Canadian government's attempts to control and subjugate his people earned him the name trouble maker with the Department of Indian Affairs and evildoer with the...

  • The Abenaki of Vermont: A Living Culture.
    Wastasecoot, James // Multicultural Review; Mar2003, Vol. 12 Issue 1, p23 

    Reviews the educational video "The Abenaki of Vermont: A Living Culture."

  • Ekin�muksikw aq Kelutmalsewuks�kw.
    Denny, Alex // Mi'kmaw Concordat; 1997, p9 

    The article looks at the contributions of S�k�j Henderson, a Chickasaw from Oklahoma, to the Mikmaw society. Henderson changed the direction of Mikmaq politics in his work as Research Director of the Union of Nova Scotia Indians and later as advisor to the Sant� Mawio'mi. Aside...

  • Conn. tribe picks first female leader.
    HAIGH, SUSAN // Native American Times; 10/16/2009, Vol. 15 Issue 41, p2 

    The article focuses on the move by the Mohegans to elevate Lynn Malerba, the tribe's vice chairwoman, to chairman. A vice chairwoman for four years and a former critical care nurse, she was given the top position by their tribal council which consists of nine members. She takes on the challenge...

  • Our Ancestors are Watching Over Us.
    Everett, Erin // New Life Journal: Carolina Edition; Dec2004/Jan2005, Vol. 6 Issue 3, p38 

    Interviews Cree elder Pauline Johnson on her knowledge and wisdom in traditional medicine from her ancestors in Canada. Ways of connecting with the world around; Ways of praying in the Cree way; facts and information on the pipe carrier.

  • Fostering Diversity and Minimizing Universals: Toward a Non-Colonialist Approach to Studying the Acquisition of Algonquian Languages.
    Mellow, J. Dean // Native Studies Review; 2010, Vol. 19 Issue 1, p67 

    Seeking to determine valid and useful analyses of the acquisition of the Algonquian language Anihshininiimowin, this article critiques Chomsky's Universal Grammar (CUG) approach and instead proposes the use of a construction-based, emergentist approach. CUG emphasizes hypothetical universals and...

  • OF DISCOIDALS AND MONONGAHELA: A LEAGUE OF THEIR OWN?
    George, Richard L. // Archaeology of Eastern North America; 2001, Vol. 29, p1 

    Biconcave discoidals have been recorded on a number of Middle to Late Monongahela sites in the Upper Ohio Valley. It is believed that the artifacts were used in the game of chunkey, based on early historic accounts in the southeastern United States as well as west of the Mississippi River. A...

  • What's in a Name?: The 1940s-1950s "Squaw Dress."
    Parezo, Nancy J.; Jones, Angelina R. // American Indian Quarterly; Jun2009, Vol. 33 Issue 3, p373 

    This article focuses on the etymology of the word "squaw" and the word's use in 1940s-1950s fashion. It states that the word "squaw" was first recorded during European contact with the Algonquian in the early 17th Century and is based on the Massachuset's squá or "woman," as well as the...

  • Maine Tribes Protest Mercury Policies.
    Parezo, Nancy J.; Jones, Angelina R. // Native American Law Digest; Jul2005, Vol. 15 Issue 7, p12 

    This article reports that the four Wabanaki tribes have joined a legal challenge to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) mercury rules. EPA has introduced a program that limits the amount pollution that can be produced, while allowing businesses to buy pollution credits from cleaner...

  • OUR BODY, OUR EARTH.
    Cardinal, Joel // UN Chronicle; 2010, Vol. 47 Issue 4, p4 

    The article focuses on issues regarding land conservation. The author discusses the culture of Cree people in Canada in relation to environmental conservation and protection. He cites issues regarding the practice of reciprocity as well as the spiritual interaction of human beings with the land....

  • THE HISTORY: Mother of States.
    Sirvaitis, Karen // Virginia (0-8225-4084-3); 2002, p16 

    In the late 1400s, three major Native American groups made their home in the area that later became Virginia. They were the Cherokee, the Susquehanna, and the Algonquians. British colonists came in the spring of 1607 to Virginia and establish the first British settlement. Meanwhile, the Indians...

  • Pocahontas.
    Sirvaitis, Karen // Virginia (0-8225-4084-3); 2002, p23 

    One of the first female heroes in Virginia's history was a young Indian, a daughter of Chief Powhatan. Her name was Pocahontas. Pocahontas was about 12 years old when the British landed in Virginia. Shortly after the newcomers arrived, the Algonquians captured the settlers' captain, John Smith....

  • COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION IN AN INDIAN SETTLEMENT.
    Rhyne, Jennings J. // Social Forces; Oct30, Vol. 9 Issue 1, p95 

    The article presents an analysis of community differentiation between whites and Shawnee Indians on a reservation in Oklahoma. Indian and white lands within the reservation are interspersed, enabling comparisons between the two races. Aspects discussed include government participation, economic...

  • Northern Algonquian concepts of status and leadership reviewed: a case study of the eighteenth-century trading captain system.
    Morantz, Toby // Canadian Review of Sociology & Anthropology; Nov82, Vol. 19 Issue 4, p482 

    The purpose of the paper is to demonstrate that the egalitarian societies produced other forms of leadership at variance with such descriptions and tolerated the emergence of leaders motivated by personal ambition. The historic peoples who are subject of the case study were Algonquian speakers....

  • NASKAPI TALES.
    Morantz, Toby // Faces; Oct2004, Vol. 21 Issue 2, p42 

    This article focuses on Naskapi Innu, a small tribe of Algonquian-speaking native people who have survived in that harsh and desolate land for thousands of years. Just south of the rugged Torngat Mountains of Labrador and across Quebec to Hudson Bay live the Naskapi Innu. During the short...

  • The Head in Edward Nugent's Hand: Roanoke's Forgotten Indians.
    WILLIAMSON, MARGARET HOLMES // Journal of Southern History; Feb2009, Vol. 75 Issue 1, p123 

    The article reviews the book "The Head in Edward Nugent's Hand: Roanoke's Forgotten Indians," by Michael Leroy Oberg.

  • Manisses.
    Williamson Jr., Chilton // National Review; 10/24/1975, Vol. 27 Issue 41, p1181 

    Discusses the history of Block Island, Rhode Island. Discovery of the island by Giovanni de Verrazano and Adrian Block; Name given by the Narragansett Indians to the Island; Reliance of the Narragansett Indians on the Englishmen who occupied the Island for protection against the Pequot Indians...

  • Frontier Flashes.
    Williamson Jr., Chilton // Wild West; Aug2008, Vol. 21 Issue 2, p10 

    The article recalls significant historical events in the Western U.S. between August 1832 and July 1898. Vigilante Frank Reid shot conman Soapy Smith in Skagway, District of Alaska on July 8, 1898 when Smith refuses to return $2,800 worth of gold that he stole from a Klondike miner. The Illinois...

  • Two Moon Many Moons After.
    Williamson Jr., Chilton // American Heritage; Jun/Jul85, Vol. 36 Issue 4, p108 

    Offers background on Cheyenne Indian Chief Two Moon (a.k.a. Two Moons). His resignation to the ways of the white man; How he posed, for money, for photographers; His victory against Custer at Little Big Horn.

  • THE INFLUENCE OF RACE AND CULTURE ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF SOCIAL ORGANIZATION IN ILLINOIS.
    Lindstrom, D. E. // Social Forces; May35, Vol. 13 Issue 4, p568 

    This article presents the author's views on the influence of race and culture on the development of social organization in Illinois. In Illinois, during the eighteenth century, when the thirteen colonies were struggling to establish themselves on the Atlantic seaboard, the population of Illinois...

  • Pocahontas's People: The Powhatan Indians of Virginia Through Four Centuries (Book).
    Davis, Mary B. // Library Journal; 10/1/1990, Vol. 115 Issue 16, p102 

    Reviews the book "Pocahontas's People: The Powhatan Indians of Virginia Through Four Centuries," by Helen C. Rountree.

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