Citations with the tag: ADCOCK, Fleur, 1934-

Results 1 - 50

  • Street Song.
    Adcock, Fleur // Fleur Adcock, Poems 1960-2000; 2000, p141 

    The lyrics to the song "Street Song," by Fleur Adcock, are presented. First line: Pink Lane, Strawberry Lane, Pudding Chare: Last Line: remember, sisters, there's more than one.

  • Note on Propertius.
    Adcock, Fleur // Fleur Adcock, Poems 1960-2000; 2000, p14 

    The poem "Note on Propertius," by Fleur Adcock, is presented. First Line: Among the Roman love-poets, possession; Last Line: and she compliant to his every wish.

  • Flight, with Mountains.
    Adcock, Fleur // Fleur Adcock, Poems 1960-2000; 2000, p15 

    The poem "Flight, With Mountains," by Fleur Adcock is presented. First Line: Tarmac, take-off: metallic words conduct us; Last Line: an arc of thunder. Gone is gone forever.

  • Beauty Abroad.
    Adcock, Fleur // Fleur Adcock, Poems 1960-2000; 2000, p17 

    The poem "Beauty Abroad," by Fleur Adcock, is presented. First Line: Carrying still the dewy rose; Last Line: sweet talk can lead him to la belle chose.

  • Instructions to Vampires.
    Adcock, Fleur // Fleur Adcock, Poems 1960-2000; 2000, p19 

    The poem "Instructions to Vampires," by Fleur Adcock, is presented. First Line: I would not have you drain; Last Line: etch my name.

  • Incident.
    Adcock, Fleur // Fleur Adcock, Poems 1960-2000; 2000, p19 

    The poem "Incident," by Fleur Adcock is presented. First Line: When you were lying on the white sand, Last Line: watching, and lighting a cigarette.

  • Unexpected Visit.
    Adcock, Fleur // Fleur Adcock, Poems 1960-2000; 2000, p20 

    The poem "Unexpected Visit," by Fleur Adcock is presented. First Line: I have nothing to say about this garden. Last Line: choose to be warm and dry.

  • For Andrew.
    Adcock, Fleur // Fleur Adcock, Poems 1960-2000; 2000, p21 

    The poem "For Andrew," by Fleur Adcock is presented. First Line: 'Will I die?' you ask. And so I enter on; Last Line: sharing in this your childish optimism.

  • Comment.
    Adcock, Fleur // Fleur Adcock, Poems 1960-2000; 2000, p22 

    The poem "Comment," by Fleur Adcock is presented. First Line: The four-year-old believes he likes; Last Line: beneath the summer trees.

  • Regression.
    Adcock, Fleur // Fleur Adcock, Poems 1960-2000; 2000, p25 

    The poem "Regression," by Fleur Adcock is presented. First Line: All the flowers have gone back into the ground. Last Line: foolish and lost on the naked skin of the earth?

  • Hauntings.
    Adcock, Fleur // Fleur Adcock, Poems 1960-2000; 2000, p28 

    The poem "Hauntings," by Fleur Adcock is presented. First Line: Three times I have slept in your house; Last Line: You needn't think I am here to stay.

  • The Water Below.
    Adcock, Fleur // Fleur Adcock, Poems 1960-2000; 2000, p30 

    The poem "The Water Below," by Fleur Adcock is presented. First Line: This house is floored with water, Last Line: the waters under the earth.

  • The Pangolin.
    Adcock, Fleur // Fleur Adcock, Poems 1960-2000; 2000, p32 

    The poem "The Pangolin," by Fleur Adcock is presented. First Line: There have been all those tigers, of course, Last Line: to be dreamt about, if he would care for it.

  • A Game.
    Adcock, Fleur // Fleur Adcock, Poems 1960-2000; 2000, p34 

    The poem "A Game," by Fleur Adcock, is presented. First Line: They are throwing the ball; Last Line: if it should fall.

  • Bogyman.
    Adcock, Fleur // Fleur Adcock, Poems 1960-2000; 2000, p35 

    The poem "Bogyman," by Fleur Adcock is presented. First Line: Stepping down from the blackberry bushes; Last Line: straight at you) something like you, Bogyman?

  • Clarendon Whatmough.
    Adcock, Fleur // Fleur Adcock, Poems 1960-2000; 2000, p36 

    The poem "Clarendon Whatmough," by Fleur Adcock is presented. First Line: Clarendon Whatmough sits in his chair; Last Line: of your existence? Are you?

  • A Surprise in the Peninsula.
    Adcock, Fleur // Fleur Adcock, Poems 1960-2000; 2000, p38 

    The poem "A Surprise in the Peninsula," by Fleur Adcock is presented. First Line: When I came in that night I found; Last Line: the nails out and took it with me.

  • Afterwards.
    Adcock, Fleur // Fleur Adcock, Poems 1960-2000; 2000, p40 

    The poem "Afterwards," by Fleur Adcock is presented. First Line: We weave haunted circles about each other, Last Line: Rain is falling. Listen to the gentle rain.

  • Happy Ending.
    Adcock, Fleur // Fleur Adcock, Poems 1960-2000; 2000, p40 

    The poem "Happy Ending," by Fleur Adcock is presented. First Line: After they had not made love; Last Line: and not that happier outcome, friends.

  • Being Blind.
    Adcock, Fleur // Fleur Adcock, Poems 1960-2000; 2000, p41 

    The poem "Being Blind," by Fleur Adcock is presented. First Line: Listen to that: Last Line: the sea. Listen.

  • Grandma.
    Adcock, Fleur // Fleur Adcock, Poems 1960-2000; 2000, p42 

    The poem "Grandma," by Fleur Adcock is presented. First Line: It was the midnight train; I was tired and edgy. Last Line: children for the gruesomeness: we do not mean it.

  • Stewart Island.
    Adcock, Fleur // Fleur Adcock, Poems 1960-2000; 2000, p44 

    The poem "Stewart Island," by Fleur Adcock is presented. First Line: `But look at all this beauty,' Last Line: decided to leave the country.

  • Saturday.
    Adcock, Fleur // Fleur Adcock, Poems 1960-2000; 2000, p45 

    The poem "Saturday," by Fleur Adcock is presented. First Line: I am sitting on the step; Last Line: already hear it purring.

  • Tress.
    Adcock, Fleur // Fleur Adcock, Poems 1960-2000; 2000, p47 

    The poem "Tress," by Fleur Adcock is presented. First Line: Elm, laburnum, hawthorn, oak: Last Line: in form) the tallest sycamore.

  • Country Station.
    Adcock, Fleur // Fleur Adcock, Poems 1960-2000; 2000, p48 

    The poem "Country Station," by Fleur Adcock is presented. First Line: First she made a little garden; Last Line: Perhaps they will stay here all day.

  • Against Coupling.
    Adcock, Fleur // Fleur Adcock, Poems 1960-2000; 2000, p49 

    The poem "Against Coupling," by Fleur Adcock is presented. First Line: I write in praise of the solitary act: Last Line: that gap between the Sunday papers and lunch.

  • Mornings After.
    Adcock, Fleur // Fleur Adcock, Poems 1960-2000; 2000, p50 

    The poem "Mornings After," by Fleur Adcock is presented. First Line: The surface dreams are easily remembered: Last Line: I do not care to know. Replace the cover.

  • Gas.
    Adcock, Fleur // Fleur Adcock, Poems 1960-2000; 2000, p52 

    The poem "Gas," by Fleur Adcock is presented. First Line: You recognise a body by its blemishes: Last Line: Come. Please.

  • The Bullaun.
    Adcock, Fleur // Fleur Adcock, Poems 1960-2000; 2000, p60 

    The poem "The Bullaun," by Fleur Adcock is presented. First Line: 'Drink water from the hollow in the stone...' Last Line: and a few mouthfuls of black rainwater.

  • Richey.
    Adcock, Fleur // Fleur Adcock, Poems 1960-2000; 2000, p62 

    The poem "Richey," by Fleur Adcock is presented. First Line: My great-grandfather Richey Brooks; Last Line: fruit. Ways of living and dying.

  • The Voyage Out.
    Adcock, Fleur // Fleur Adcock, Poems 1960-2000; 2000, p62 

    The poem "The Voyage Out," by Fleur Adcock is presented. First Line: The weekly dietary scale; Last Line: and no more Ireland than went with her.

  • Nelia.
    Adcock, Fleur // Fleur Adcock, Poems 1960-2000; 2000, p64 

    The poem "Train from the Hook of Holland," by Fleur Adcock is presented. First Line: She writes to me from a stony island; Last Line: uninterrupted from her to the still sun.

  • Moa Point.
    Adcock, Fleur // Fleur Adcock, Poems 1960-2000; 2000, p64 

    The poem "Moa Point," by Fleur Adcock is presented. First Line: At Moa Point that afternoon; Last Line: handed it back.

  • Briddes.
    Adcock, Fleur // Fleur Adcock, Poems 1960-2000; 2000, p65 

    The poem "Briddes," by Fleur Adcock is presented. First Line: 'Briddes' he used to call them, Last Line: All other birds were birds.

  • The Famous Traitor.
    Adcock, Fleur // Fleur Adcock, Poems 1960-2000; 2000, p65 

    The poem "The Famous Traitor," by Fleur Adcock is presented. First Line: His jailer trod on a rose-petal. Last Line: of his name; like what he did it for.

  • Script.
    Adcock, Fleur // Fleur Adcock, Poems 1960-2000; 2000, p66 

    The poem "Script," by Fleur Adcock is presented. First Line: 'Wet the tea, Jinny, the men are back: Last Line: always the taking-in and the sending-out.

  • Pupation.
    Adcock, Fleur // Fleur Adcock, Poems 1960-2000; 2000, p70 

    The poem "Pupation," by Fleur Adcock is presented. First Line: Books, music, the garden, cats: Last Line: Ichneumon flies have got in.

  • The Drought Breaks.
    Adcock, Fleur // Fleur Adcock, Poems 1960-2000; 2000, p70 

    The poem "The Drought Breaks," by Fleur Adcock is presented. First Line: That wet gravelly sound is rain. Last Line: You lean over me, smiling at last.

  • Kilpeck.
    Adcock, Fleur // Fleur Adcock, Poems 1960-2000; 2000, p71 

    The poem "Kilpeck," by Fleur Adcock is presented. First Line: We are dried and brittle this morning, Last Line: We are wearing out our identities.

  • Feverish.
    Adcock, Fleur // Fleur Adcock, Poems 1960-2000; 2000, p72 

    The poem "Feverish," by Fleur Adcock is presented. First Line: Only a slight fever: Last Line: Age is a sad fever.

  • Folie à Deux.
    Adcock, Fleur // Fleur Adcock, Poems 1960-2000; 2000, p73 

    The poem "Folie à Deux," by Fleur Adcock is presented. First Line: They call it pica, Last Line: go to our sacrament.

  • Acris Hiems.
    Adcock, Fleur // Fleur Adcock, Poems 1960-2000; 2000, p74 

    The poem "Acris Hiems," by Fleur Adcock is presented. First Line: A letter from that pale city; Last Line: Bring out your dead.

  • December Morning.
    Adcock, Fleur // Fleur Adcock, Poems 1960-2000; 2000, p75 

    The poem "December Morning," by Fleur Adcock is presented. First Line: I raise the blind and sit by the window; Last Line: walking their unlovable dogs.

  • Showcase.
    Adcock, Fleur // Fleur Adcock, Poems 1960-2000; 2000, p76 

    The poem "Showcase," by Fleur Adcock is presented. First Line: Looking through the glass showcase; Last Line: rescued from drowning; and your eyes close.

  • Over the Edge.
    Adcock, Fleur // Fleur Adcock, Poems 1960-2000; 2000, p76 

    The poem "Over the Edge," by Fleur Adcock is presented. First Line: All my dead people; Last Line: possessing nothing but balance.

  • The Net.
    Adcock, Fleur // Fleur Adcock, Poems 1960-2000; 2000, p77 

    The poem "The Net," by Fleur Adcock is presented. First Line: She keeps the memory-game; Last Line: and the wire trellis that will trap her in the end.

  • An Illustration to Dante.
    Adcock, Fleur // Fleur Adcock, Poems 1960-2000; 2000, p77 

    The poem "An Illustration to Dante," by Fleur Adcock is presented. First Line: Here are Paolo and Francesca; Last Line: My spine trickles with little white flames.

  • Tokens.
    Adcock, Fleur // Fleur Adcock, Poems 1960-2000; 2000, p77 

    The poem "Tokens," by Fleur Adcock is presented. First Line: The sheets have been laundered clean; Last Line: your voice speaking in my poems.

  • Naxal.
    Adcock, Fleur // Fleur Adcock, Poems 1960-2000; 2000, p78 

    The poem "Naxal," by Fleur Adcock is presented. First Line: The concrete road from the palace to the cinema; Last Line: touching an infant's head, a little pain.

  • Bodnath.
    Adcock, Fleur // Fleur Adcock, Poems 1960-2000; 2000, p79 

    The poem "Bodnath," by Fleur Adcock is presented. First Line: I have made my pilgrimage a day early: Last Line: smouldering incense crumbles to ash.

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