Citations with the tag: ABRAMSON, Seth

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  • The Undercard.
    Abramson, Seth // Salmagundi; Spring/Summer2008, Issue 158/159, p108 

    Presents the poem "The Undercard," by Seth Abramson. First Line: For a while it's the best kind; Last Line: about the only thing down don't have.

  • Lullaby.
    Abramson, Seth // Beloit Poetry Journal; Spring2007, Vol. 57 Issue 3, p36 

    The poem "Lullaby" by Seth Abramson is presented. First Line: At the store I bought; Last Line: because they are lived, too, in the shape of a lie.

  • Survive This.
    Abramson, Seth // Notre Dame Review; Summer/Fall2008, Issue 26, p154 

    Presents the poem "Survive This," by Seth Abramson. First Line: When you dance badly, Last Line: against the window-pane.

  • Their Orbit.
    Abramson, Seth // Notre Dame Review; Summer/Fall2008, Issue 26, p155 

    Presents the poem "Their Orbit," by Seth Abramson. First Line: Stones which were thrown at the embassy; Last Line: but still—something—

  • Reliquary.
    Abramson, Seth // AGNI; 2006, Issue 63, p151 

    Presents the poem "Reliquary," by Seth Abramson. First Line: Of all the inventions (kohlrabi, lettuce, Last Line: I will hear it.

  • GENESIS.
    Abramson, Seth // Common-Place: The Interactive Journal of Early American Life; Jul2015, Vol. 15 Issue 3.5, p8 

    The poem "Genesis" by Seth Abramson is presented. First Line: Much made of little. Little made of knowledge. Knowledge made of scholarship. Last Line: made of women.

  • Nebraska.
    Abramson, Seth // Poetry; May2008, Vol. 192 Issue 2, p115 

    Presents the poem "Nebraska," by Seth Abramson. First Line: 1981, Last Line: I wish I was here in Nebraska.

  • The Supernumerary.
    Abramson, Seth // Madison Review; Spring2008, Vol. 29 Issue 2, p38 

    The poem "The Supernumerary," by Seth Abramson is presented. First Line: He has been asked to carry a hat. Whose; Last Line: will not be needed, now.

  • Deadwork.
    Abramson, Seth // Laurel Review; Summer2009, Vol. 43 Issue 2, p81 

    Presents the poem "Deadwork," by Seth Abramson. First Line: Some days, nobody knew the way there; Last Line: while it still mattered.

  • Oui.
    Abramson, Seth // Georgetown Review; Spring2010, Vol. 11 Issue 1, p39 

    The article presents the poem "Oui," by Seth Abramson. First Line: If he wraps his Saturn around the utility pole; Last Line: is the use of his legs.

  • American Letters.
    Abramson, Seth // Salmagundi; Spring/Summer2008, Issue 158/159, p107 

    Presents the poem "American Letters," by Seth Abramson. First Line: The way you put a pillow beneath; Last Line: what I wrote. You. Anything else would have answered the question.

  • Two Submissives.
    Abramson, Seth // Salmagundi; Spring/Summer2008, Issue 158/159, p110 

    Presents the poem "Two Submissives," by Seth Abramson. First Line: It's not perfect— Last Line: in love. He loves her.

  • EDITORIAL: Two decades of critical inquiry.
    Abramson, Seth // Pacific Journalism Review; May2015, Vol. 21 Issue 1, p7 

    An introduction is presented in which the author discusses various reports within the issue on topics including the documentary film "Cap Bocage," by Jim Marbrook, the social aspects of journalism, and the political ecology.

  • Captains in Captivity.
    Abramson, Seth // Poetry; Mar2009, Vol. 193 Issue 6, p534 

    The article presents the poem "Captains in Captivity," by Seth Abramson. First Line: She came to see him in the safehouse; Last Line: as poorly as he had just then.

  • Idiot House.
    Abramson, Seth // Crazyhorse; Fall2008, Issue 74, p33 

    Presents the poem "Idiot House," by Seth Abramson. First Line: Lifting the luggage I found luggage beneath it. I lifted; Last Line: we otherwise might've kept in plastic, for the duration.

  • Elm & Vine.
    Abramson, Seth // Green Mountains Review; 2008, Vol. 21 Issue 1, p7 

    Presents the poem "Elm & Vine," by Seth Abramson. First Line: Sometimes; Last Line: into steam.

  • The Damn Day.
    Abramson, Seth // Seneca Review; Spring2009, Vol. 39 Issue 1, p82 

    Presents the poem "The Damn Day," by Seth Abramson. First Line: To one cartwheeling indoors I said; Last Line: I was there. Everyone could see it.

  • Sundays are Quick.
    Abramson, Seth // Quarterly West; Spring/Summer2006, Issue 62, p12 

    The article presents the poem "Sundays Are Quick," by Seth Abramson. First Line: There will be three more deployments of geese; Last Line: discovers, in the fields afire, the perfect promise.

  • Elm & Vine.
    Abramson, Seth // Green Mountains Review; 2012, Vol. 25 Issue 1, p9 

    The poem "Elm & Vine" by Seth Abramson is presented with a brief personal narrative on the topic of working as a defense attorney for women charged with prostitution. First Line: Sometimes. Last Line: into steam.

  • Hands Are Wood.
    Abramson, Seth // Poetry; May2008, Vol. 192 Issue 2, p116 

    Presents the poem "Hands Are Wood," by Seth Abramson. First Line: Come see the woodpile behind the cannery. Last Line: what they were made to do.

  • Provincetown Fourth.
    Abramson, Seth // Poetry; May2008, Vol. 192 Issue 2, p117 

    Presents the poem "Provincetown Fourth," by Seth Abramson. First Line: Here we are; Last Line: to the war—

  • The Last Inch.
    Abramson, Seth // Gulf Coast: A Journal of Literature & Fine Arts; Winter2009/Spring2010, Vol. 22 Issue 1, p190 

    Presents the poem "The Last Inch," by Seth Abramson. First Line: Gentle men are in a bad way; Last Line: let us be good to one another.

  • The Ark Of.
    Abramson, Seth // Boston Review; Jul/Aug2006, Vol. 31 Issue 4, p11 

    Presents the poem "The Ark Of," by Seth Abramson. First Line: Better this; Last Line: be well.

  • The Nigerian Metanarrative.
    Abramson, Seth // Subtropics; Winter/Spring2009, Issue 7, p63 

    The article presents the poem "The Nigerian Metanarrative," by Seth Abramson. First Line: The radio station had signed off on; Last Line: Could be analogized.

  • Client Interviews.
    Abramson, Seth // American Poetry Review; Nov/Dec2010, Vol. 39 Issue 6, p34 

    Presents the poem "Client Interviews," by Seth Abramson. First Line: If I lose my bicycle; Last Line: if they break.

  • Valentine to a Blackguard.
    Abramson, Seth // Southern Review; Spring2006, Vol. 42 Issue 2, p384 

    Presents the poem "Valentine to a Blackguard," by Seth Abramson. First Line: For which coins I; Last Line: any longer stay lovely in my memory.

  • The History of the Fairgrounds.
    Abramson, Seth // Southern Review; Spring2006, Vol. 42 Issue 2, p385 

    Presents the poem "The History of the Fairgrounds," by Seth Abramson. First Line: Modeled upon the sort of man who arrives to build; Last Line: are forgiven: as a man say, who shrieks openly in the temple.

  • Samson at the Pillar.
    Abramson, Seth // Southern Review; Autumn2011, Vol. 47 Issue 4, p572 

    The poem "Samson at the Pillar" by Seth Abramson is presented. First Line: At first he belongs to heaven the way; Last Line: is anything.

  • A Condemned Room.
    Abramson, Seth // Laurel Review; Summer2009, Vol. 43 Issue 2, p80 

    Presents the poem "A Condemned Room," by Seth Abramson. First Line: Is in a heliocentric city with a garden in sun; Last Line: damnation.

  • Manual for the Spirit in Translation.
    Abramson, Seth // CutBank; Spring2007, Issue 67, p48 

    Presents the poem "Manual for the Spirit in Translation," by Seth Abramson. First Line: Place schematic at rear of opulent/translucent; Last Line: with absence of product recall.

  • Public Defender.
    Abramson, Seth // Iowa Review; Winter2006/2007, Vol. 36 Issue 3, p166 

    Presents the poem "Public Defender," by Seth Abramson. First Line: Think Scheherzade. Not this story again. Think that; Last Line: (but at least you shook their hands).

  • Based on the True Story.
    Abramson, Seth // New Orleans Review; 2009, Vol. 35 Issue 2, p82 

    Presents the poem "Based on the True Story," by Seth Abramson. First Line: I know what it means to need the garbage; Last Line: in a language you can read.

  • Driving Home From the Orgy.
    Abramson, Seth // Salmagundi; Spring/Summer2008, Issue 158/159, p105 

    Presents the poem "Driving Home From the Orgy," by Seth Abramson. First Line: Everyone saw; Last Line: to ignore the pull of instruction.

  • SHAKE OUR HAND.
    Abramson, Seth // New York Quarterly; Jan2009, Issue 65, p162 

    The article presents the poem "Shake Our Hands," by Seth Abramson.

  • Thessaly Needs Its Daughters.
    Abramson, Seth // North Dakota Quarterly; Summer2003, Vol. 70 Issue 3, p82 

    Presents the poem "Thessaly Needs Its Daughters," by Seth Abramson.

  • Some Drowned Archer.
    Abramson, Seth // Minnesota Review (Minnesota Review); Fall2010, Issue 75, p20 

    Presents the poem "Some Drowned Archer," by Seth Abramson. First Line: Where the waterway gives out there is mud; Last Line: An archer shoots. That's what an archer does.

  • What I Have.
    Abramson, Seth // Poetry; Mar2009, Vol. 193 Issue 6, p532 

    The article presents the poem "What I Have," by Seth Abramson. First Line: Twelve dollars sixty cents, Last Line: will change it.

  • The Home-field.
    Abramson, Seth // Crazyhorse; Fall2008, Issue 74, p34 

    Presents the poem "The Home-field," by Seth Abramson. First Line: Sometimes it lofts its music into the croft; Last Line: is loving him still, sometimes is loving him only.

  • What Sex Means to Me.
    Abramson, Seth // Pleiades; 2009, Vol. 29 Issue 1, p97 

    Presents the poem "What Sex Means to Me," by Seth Abramson. First Line: When you are a city; Last Line: from the clearing & gone & gone as empty is gone.

  • Home Causes Blindness.
    Abramson, Seth // Seneca Review; Spring2009, Vol. 39 Issue 1, p81 

    Presents the poem "Home Causes Blindness," by Seth Abramson. First Line: You have seen big men get bigger; Last Line: those loving you never leave you.

  • Dream of a Variable Surface.
    Abramson, Seth // Notre Dame Review; Summer2006, Issue 22, p1 

    Presents the poem "Dream of a Variable Surface," by Seth Abramson. First Line: Shaman, I am told, or caliph— Last Line: and the oceans rise, imperfectly, into oceans, the sunlight.

  • Moses Gets Central Air.
    Abramson, Seth // Notre Dame Review; Summer2006, Issue 22, p2 

    Presents the poem "Moses Gets Central Air," by Seth Abramson. First Line: This is the scene; Last Line: he has been told.

  • Maenad Tearing Orpheus.
    Abramson, Seth // Notre Dame Review; Summer2006, Issue 22, p4 

    Presents the poem "Maenad Tearing Orpheus," by Seth Abramson. First Line: The smile, not so much cursed as legendary, went one way; Last Line: than literal: she'd forgotten how to do it; it never happened.

  • A Brief History for Ventriloquists.
    Abramson, Seth // Legal Studies Forum; 2006, Vol. 30 Issue 1/2, p577 

    Presents the poem "A Brief History for Ventriloquists," by Seth Abramson. First Line: Its Egyptian inventors would describe; Last Line: "It's Turtles, Turtles, all the way down…"

  • Sixth-Day Shelter.
    Abramson, Seth // Notre Dame Review; Summer/Fall2008, Issue 26, p156 

    Presents the poem "Sixty-Day Shelter," by Seth Abramson. First Line: Sometimes a boy would go off mission; Last Line: is an important skill.

  • Show Me State.
    Abramson, Seth // Green Mountains Review; 2009, Vol. 22 Issue 1, p7 

    Presents the poem "Show Me State," by Seth Abramson. First Line: The chickens are unthinkingly on high alert, Last Line: just days away.

  • Enough About Me.
    Abramson, Seth // Natural Bridge; Fall2008, Issue 20, p1 

    Presents the poem "Enough About Me," by Seth Abramson. First Line: I want to know, Israel, Last Line: this terrible, terrible relevance.

  • WHAT HE'S LISTENING TO.
    Block, Valerie // Crain's New York Business; 2/15/2010, Vol. 26 Issue 7, p27 

    The article presents information on Seth Abramson, the artistic director of Jazz Standard. He spends much of his day listening to recordings of artists who want to perform at the West 27th Street club. He said that he gets as many as 100 submissions a month. It is stated that when he has some...

  • Enki and Inanna, after the Underworld.
    Abramson, Seth // Gettysburg Review; Summer2007, Vol. 20 Issue 2, p321 

    Presents the poem "Enki and Inanna, after the Underworld," by Seth Abramson. First Line: He carried her most of the way home, Last Line: on her own.

  • The Luminaries Meet at Firebase One.
    Abramson, Seth // Western Humanities Review; Winter2007, Vol. 61 Issue 1, p141 

    The article presents the poem "The Luminaries Meet at Firebase One," by Seth Abramson. First Line: When Emily Bronte fled from her furious father to Gondal, which I make to be; Last Line: and the people you've known in bodies are only ghosts, returning to your fantasy.

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