TITLE

AVIATION SECURITY: Progress Made but Actions Needed to Address Challenges in Meeting the Air Cargo Screening Mandate

AUTHOR(S)
Lord, Steve
PUB. DATE
June 2010
SOURCE
GAO Reports;6/30/2010, preceding p1
SOURCE TYPE
Government Documents
DOC. TYPE
Speech
ABSTRACT
The article presents a speech by Steve Lord, director of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS), in which he discusses the subject of air cargo screening as mandated by the 9/11 Commission Act of 2007. He says that the incident on December 25, 2009 where a plot to detonate an explosive in an international flight bound for Detroit suggests that terrorist view passenger aircrafts as attractive targets.
ACCESSION #
52159982

 

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