TITLE

Slowworm

PUB. DATE
January 2009
SOURCE
World Book Science Dataset;1/1/2009, p1
SOURCE TYPE
Encyclopedia
DOC. TYPE
Reference Entry
ABSTRACT
Slowworm, a limbless lizard that inhabits forests and grasslands of Europe, western Asia, and Algeria. It has the sinuous, gliding movements of a worm or a snake. The slow-worm reaches a length of about 20 inches (50 cm). It is covered with smooth, shiny scales and is bronze or greenish-bronze above and black below. It has long, sharp teeth and feeds on slugs, earthworms, and insects. Mating occurs in the spring; the young, usually numbering from 6 to 20, are born live in the late summer. The slowworm burrows into the ground and hibernates there over the winter.
ACCESSION #
37310180

 

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