TITLE

Drongo

PUB. DATE
January 2009
SOURCE
World Book Science Dataset;1/1/2009, p1
SOURCE TYPE
Encyclopedia
DOC. TYPE
Reference Entry
ABSTRACT
Drongo, a tree-dwelling bird native to the Eastern Hemisphere. Drongos are 7 to 25 inches (18 to 64 cm) long. They are usually black with a greenish, purplish, or bluish sheen. Drongos are spectacular flyers, swooping and twisting in pursuit of insects.
ACCESSION #
37310014

 

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