TITLE

Leafhopper

PUB. DATE
January 2009
SOURCE
World Book Science Dataset;1/1/2009, p1
SOURCE TYPE
Encyclopedia
DOC. TYPE
Reference Entry
ABSTRACT
Leafhopper, a leaping insect that sucks plant juices. There are more than 2,500 species in North America and more than 15,000 worldwide. Leafhoppers are from 1/16 to 5/8 of an inch (2 to 15 mm) in length. The female has an organ called an ovipositor that she uses to insert eggs in stems or leaves. Two or more broods are typically produced yearly. Leafhoppers secrete a sweet substance called honeydew, which is eaten by ants, wasps, and other insects attracted to sweets.
ACCESSION #
37309657

 

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