TITLE

Gum Tree

PUB. DATE
January 2009
SOURCE
World Book Science Dataset;1/1/2009, p1
SOURCE TYPE
Encyclopedia
DOC. TYPE
Reference Entry
ABSTRACT
Gum Tree, any tree that yields a sticky substance known as gum. The sour gum, also called tupelo, is common in the eastern United States. Other North American gum trees include the sweet gum and the eucalyptus, which was introduced into California from Australia. The sapodilla tree of southern Mexico and Central America is the source of a gum called chicle, which is used as the base for many types of chewing gum.
ACCESSION #
37309478

 

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