TITLE

Dada /dah dah/

PUB. DATE
June 2001
SOURCE
Artist's Illustrated Encyclopedia;2001, p125
SOURCE TYPE
Book
DOC. TYPE
Reference Entry
ABSTRACT
A definition of the term "Dada" is presented. It refers to an artistic, literary and political movement that began in 1915 as a revolt against traditional bourgeois values. Dada artists created works that were intended to shock the viewer and show the artists' disgust with contemporary living.
ACCESSION #
36916300

 

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