TITLE

ANCIENT AND CLASSICAL PERIODS, 3500 B.C.E.-500 C.E. - EARLY CIVILIZATIONS AND CLASSICAL EMPIRES OF SOUTH AND EAST ASIA - JAPAN, TO 527 C.E. - RELIGION

PUB. DATE
January 2001
SOURCE
Encyclopedia of World History;2001, p55
SOURCE TYPE
Encyclopedia
DOC. TYPE
Reference Entry
ABSTRACT
Information about the history of religions in Japan is presented. The early religion of Japan included a worship of various manifestations of the powers of nature and a system of observing rituals. An organized mythology evolved which was centered on the Sun Goddess and her descendants. The combination of nature worship and ritualism was later given the name of the Shinto religion.
ACCESSION #
28535726

 

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