TITLE

tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome

PUB. DATE
January 2005
SOURCE
Taber's Cyclopedic Medical Dictionary;2005, p2252
SOURCE TYPE
Book
DOC. TYPE
Reference Entry
ABSTRACT
A definition of the term "tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome" is presented. It refers to a rare, dominantly inherited autoinflammatory disorder caused by a mutation in a cell receptor for tumor necrosis factor. It is marked by bouts of abdominal pain, fever, myalgia and arthralgia, pleurisy, and conjunctivitis.
ACCESSION #
21249698

 

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