TITLE

tickle

PUB. DATE
January 2005
SOURCE
Taber's Cyclopedic Medical Dictionary;2005, p2190
SOURCE TYPE
Book
DOC. TYPE
Reference Entry
ABSTRACT
A definition of the term "tickle" is presented. It refers to a sensation caused by titillation or touching, particularly in certain areas of the body. The sensation results in reflex muscular movements, laughter, or other forms of emotional expression. It also means to arouse such a sensation by touching a surface lightly.
ACCESSION #
21248713

 

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