TITLE

testosterone

PUB. DATE
January 2005
SOURCE
Taber's Cyclopedic Medical Dictionary;2005, p2163
SOURCE TYPE
Book
DOC. TYPE
Reference Entry
ABSTRACT
A definition of the term "testosterone" is presented. It refers to a steroid sex hormone that plays a role in the growth and development of masculine characteristics. This hormone influences the maturation of male sexual organs, development of sperm, sexual drive, erectile function of the penis, and male secondary sexual characteristics.
ACCESSION #
21248260

 

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