TITLE

synesthesia

PUB. DATE
January 2005
SOURCE
Taber's Cyclopedic Medical Dictionary;2005, p2129
SOURCE TYPE
Book
DOC. TYPE
Reference Entry
ABSTRACT
A definition of the term "synesthesia" is presented. It refers to a sensation in one area from a stimulus applied to another part and subjective sensation of a sense other than the one being stimulated.
ACCESSION #
21247683

 

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