TITLE

POLYPTOTON (Gr. "word in many cases"; Lat. traductio)

AUTHOR(S)
T.V.F.B.
PUB. DATE
January 1993
SOURCE
New Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry & Poetics;1993, p967
SOURCE TYPE
Book
DOC. TYPE
Reference Entry
ABSTRACT
The article presents a definition of the term POLYPTOTON. Related to the varieties of simple word-repetition or iteration, which in Cl. rhet. are treated under the genus of place (q.v.), is another class of figures which repeat a word or words by varying their word-class (part of speech) or by giving different forms of the same root or stem. Shakespeare takes great interest in this device; it increases patterning without wearying the ear, and it takes advantage of the differing functions, energies, and positionings that different word-classes are permitted in speech.
ACCESSION #
18912175

 

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