TITLE

ARABIC PROSODY

AUTHOR(S)
D.S.
PUB. DATE
January 1993
SOURCE
New Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry & Poetics;1993, p91
SOURCE TYPE
Book
DOC. TYPE
Reference Entry
ABSTRACT
The article presents a definition of the term ARABIC PROSODY. The earliest extant examples of Ar. poetry (q.v.) which date to the middle of the 6th c. A.D., already show highly developed metrical organization. Yet an elaborate system describing the meters of this poetry was laid down only two centuries later by al-Khalīl Ibn Ahmad (d. ca. 791), who is generally regarded as the founder of Ar. pros.
ACCESSION #
18911568

Tags: VERSIFICATION;  TERMS & phrases;  POETICS;  ARABIC poetry;  MUSICAL meter & rhythm;  AESTHETICS

 

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