TITLE

Spenser's mannerist manoeuvres: Prothalamion (1596)

AUTHOR(S)
Eriksen, Roy
PUB. DATE
March 1993
SOURCE
Studies in Philology;Spring93, Vol. 90 Issue 2, p143
SOURCE TYPE
Review
DOC. TYPE
Poetry Review
ABSTRACT
Analyzes Edmund Spenser's poem `Prothalamion.' Reflection on the poet's feelings as a rejected lover; Poem's latent conflicts; Technical analysis; Emphasis on aesthetic theory; Appreciation of variations; Influence of mannerist theories.
ACCESSION #
9307095449

 

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