TITLE

The Caesura in Spenser’s Amoretti LXVII

AUTHOR(S)
Festa, Thomas
PUB. DATE
December 2012
SOURCE
Notes & Queries;Dec2012, Vol. 59 Issue 4, p520
SOURCE TYPE
Review
DOC. TYPE
Poetry Review
ABSTRACT
A critique is presented of the Edmund Spenser poems "Amoretti LXVII," a sonnet about Easter eve, and "The Faerie Queene," about King Arthur, focusing on the poems' caesura and themes of hunting, love, and venery. Free will, symbolism, and imitation in the poems are discussed, and references to humanist poet Petrarch and English poet Thomas Wyatt are mentioned.
ACCESSION #
83746603

 

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