TITLE

Theologizing 'Underneath the Tree': an African topos in Ukawsaw Gronniosaw, William Blake, and William Cole

AUTHOR(S)
Echeruo, Michael J. C.
PUB. DATE
December 1992
SOURCE
Research in African Literatures;Winter1992, Vol. 23 Issue 4, p51
SOURCE TYPE
Review
DOC. TYPE
Poetry Review
ABSTRACT
This article offers criticism of the poem "The Little Black Boy," written by William Blake. The article also discusses the poem "Thoughts in Exile" by William Cole and the book "A Narrative of the Most Remarkable Particulars in the Life of James Albert, Akawsaw Granwasaw, as Dictated by Himself" by Jim Akawsaw Granwasa Albert.
ACCESSION #
15521188

 

Related Articles

  • The Little Black Boy. Blake, William // Poems of William Blake;3/1/2006, p3 

    Presents the poem "The Little Black Boy," by William Blake. First Line: My mother bore me in the southern wild, Last Line: And be like him, and he will then love me.

  • The Little Black Boy. Blake, W. // Book of Georgian Verse;1909, p320 

    The poem "The Little Black Boy," by W. Blake is presented. First Line: My mother bore me in the southern wild, Last Line: And be like him, and he will then love me.

  • The Little Black Boy. BLAKE, WILLIAM // Oxford Book of English Verse: 1250-1900;1922, p560 

    The poem "The Little Black Boy," by William Blake is presented. First Line: My mother bore me in the southern wild, Last Line: And be like him, and he will then love me.

  • THE LITTLE BLACK BOY.  // Poetical Works of William Blake, Vol. 1;1906, p65 

    The poem "The Little Black Boy" by William Blake is presented. First Line: MY mother bore me in the southern wild, Last Line: And be like him, and he will then love me.

  • The Little Black Boy. Blake, William // Library of the World's Best Literature, Ancient & Modern -- Volu;3/1/2006, p85 

    Presents the poem "The Little Black Boy," an excerpt from "Songs of Innocence," by William Blake. First Line: My Mother bore me in the Southern wild, Last Line: And be like him, and he will then love me.

  • Colonialism, race, and lyric irony in Blake's `The Little Black Boy'. Richardson, Alan // Papers on Language & Literature;Spring90, Vol. 26 Issue 2, p233 

    Discusses the poem `The Little Black Boy,' by William Blake as a site for examining relations of lyric and ideology. Relevance to contemporary social and political issues; Suspicions that the poem reflects the racist assumptions underlying much antislave writing; Didactic character and mass...

  • "THE HEAT TO BEAR". Marriott, David // Religion & Literature;Autumn2013, Vol. 45 Issue 3, p201 

    The author reflects on "The Little Black Boy," a poem by William Blake that was published during a time when slavery was legal and the campaign for the abolition of slavery was still young. It mentions that through the poem Blake questions the conventions of the time with basic Christian ideals...

  • The Deconstruction of the Cartesian Dichotomy of Black and Whitein William Blake's The Little Black Boy. Gunes, Ali // Journal of History, Culture & Art Research / Tarih Kültür ve S;Jun2015, Vol. 4 Issue 2, p144 

    This paper discusses English Romantic Poet William Blake's anti-racial views in his poem The Little Black Boy. In so doing, it focuses upon how Blake attempts to deconstruct the Cartesian dichotomy of Western world view, a dichotomy which has usually been based on "the theory that the universe...

  • Not for the Kiddies. Ferber, Michael // Academe;Jul/Aug2001, Vol. 87 Issue 4, p50 

    Discusses the experiences of a publisher who was asked to edit a selection of poems for children by the English poet William Blake and found that it is unsuitable for children. Opinion on the designs and the text of Blake; Views on the poem `The Little Black Boy'; Reason for not publishing the...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics