TITLE

Parable of a Blade of Grass

AUTHOR(S)
Reeves, Roger
PUB. DATE
July 2007
SOURCE
Gulf Coast: A Journal of Literature & Fine Arts;Summer/Fall2007, Vol. 19 Issue 2, p210
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Poem
ABSTRACT
Presents the poem "Parable of a Blade of Grass," by Roger Reeves. First Line: Where the fire enters; Last Line: Love is when you can hear the flood coming.
ACCESSION #
25657323

 

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