TITLE

THREE BIRDS

AUTHOR(S)
Baro, Gene
PUB. DATE
July 1961
SOURCE
New Yorker;7/15/1961, Vol. 37 Issue 22, p66
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Poem
ABSTRACT
The article presents the poem "Three Birds," by Gene Baro. First Line: A cage without its bird; Last Line: singing in the brake.
ACCESSION #
22777734

 

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