TITLE

Keep Sweet

AUTHOR(S)
Gillilan, Strickland W.
PUB. DATE
January 1921
SOURCE
It Can Be Done: Poems of Inspiration;1/1/1921, p153
SOURCE TYPE
Classic Book
DOC. TYPE
Poem
ABSTRACT
Presents the poem "Keep Sweet," by Strickland W. Gillilan. First Line: Don't be foolish and get sour when things don't just come your way— Last Line: Keep sweet.
ACCESSION #
22727712

 

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