TITLE

THESE STONES

AUTHOR(S)
Truax, Hawley
PUB. DATE
October 1968
SOURCE
New Yorker;10/12/1968, Vol. 44 Issue 34, p64
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Poem
ABSTRACT
The article presents the poem "These Stones," by Hawley Truax. First Line: Even to walk in pain is earthen paradise. Last Line: to music all their own beneath this night.
ACCESSION #
22367241

 

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