TITLE

Magical Dangers

AUTHOR(S)
Hughes, Ted
PUB. DATE
July 1970
SOURCE
New Yorker;7/18/1970, Vol. 46 Issue 22, p30
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Poem
ABSTRACT
The article presents the poem "Magical Dangers," by Ted Hughes. First Line: Crow thought of a palace— Last Line: Never again moved.
ACCESSION #
19331043

 

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