TITLE

The Greenhouse Effect

AUTHOR(S)
Bradley, George
PUB. DATE
April 1995
SOURCE
New Republic;4/17/95, Vol. 212 Issue 16, p46
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Poem
ABSTRACT
Presents the poem "The Greenhouse Effect," by George Bradley. First Line: Funny how all it wants is the slightest shift; Last Line: Blushes to behold us, het-up haematotherms.
ACCESSION #
15985169

 

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