TITLE

My Place Is With You (Poem)

AUTHOR(S)
Bialik, Hayyim Nahman; Leon; Wieseltier
PUB. DATE
September 2003
SOURCE
New Republic;9/22/2003, Vol. 229 Issue 12, p34
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Poem
ABSTRACT
Presents a poem called "My Place is With You," written by Hayyim Nahman Bialik.
ACCESSION #
10815788

 

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