TITLE

Killing and disabling: a comment on Sinnott-Armstrong and Miller

AUTHOR(S)
McMahan, Jeff
PUB. DATE
January 2013
SOURCE
Journal of Medical Ethics;Jan2013, Vol. 39 Issue 1, p10
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Opinion
ABSTRACT
The author offers comments on the article "What Makes Killing Wrong," by Walter Sinnott-Armstrong and Franklin G. Miller. He criticizes the view of Sinnott-Armstrong and Miller that the wrongness of killing is fully explicable when it comes to the wrongness of disabling. However, he agrees with the authors' argument that it can be permissible to kill human that has irreversibly lost the capacity for consciousness in order to use his or her organs for transplantation.
ACCESSION #
85818829

 

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