TITLE

Who Knew? You Can Be Too Thin! Of Course, Most People Aren't

AUTHOR(S)
Phillips, Barbara A.
PUB. DATE
December 2010
SOURCE
Internal Medicine Alert;12/29/2010, Vol. 32 Issue 24, p185
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Opinion
ABSTRACT
In this article, the author comments on the results of the study about the body-mass index and mortality of American adults.
ACCESSION #
57803290

 

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