TITLE

DoJ pursuit of financial crime declines amid shifting priorities

PUB. DATE
May 2007
SOURCE
Hill;5/8/2007, Vol. 14 Issue 53, p39
SOURCE TYPE
Newspaper
DOC. TYPE
Opinion
ABSTRACT
The author comments on the redirection of U.S. Department of Justice (DoJ) resources to homeland security, and notes that this shift has made the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) less able to pursue cases of financial crime and fraud.
ACCESSION #
56469666

 

Related Articles

  • Corporate Crackdown. Byrne, Alanna // InsideCounsel;May2012, Vol. 23 Issue 245, p15 

    The article offers brief information on the announcement of attorney general Eric Holder that the U.S. Department of Justice will severely pursue corporate fraud cases and will facilitate implementing heavier penalties to offenders.

  • Antitrust case drop may be due to politics, lax lawyers. Duggan, Michael A. // Marketing News;12/14/1979, Vol. 13 Issue 12, p6 

    Discusses the factors that contribute to the decline of antitrust cases in the U.S. in 1979. Number of antitrust cases brought by the U.S. Department of Justice in 1979; Reasons for the lack of attention given by the U.S. Department of Justice to antitrust enforcement; Analysis of the...

  • Business Bashes Sentencing Plans. Anderson, Charles-Edward // ABA Journal;Jan1991, Vol. 77 Issue 1, p30 

    Reports on the debate concerning the plans for sanctioning corporate crime released by the U.S. Sentencing Commission and the Justice Department. Position of American Bar Association on the issue; Adoption of organizational guidelines.

  • DOJ's Catch-22: Corporate Criminal Antitrust Targets Walk A Blurry Line with Culpable Employees. Seebald, Craig P.; Schnapp, Brian D. // Antitrust Source;Aug2016, Vol. 15 Issue 6, p1 

    The article focuses on the investigation of corporate crimes by the U.S. Department of Justice regarding the antitrust law and discusses topics such as the responsibility of individuals, the compliance programs focusing on individuals, and suggestions on what a company should do.

  • DOJ Has Taken Steps to Better Track Its Use of Deferred and Non-Prosecution Agreements, but Should Evaluate Effectiveness.  // GAO Reports;1/11/2010, preceding p1 

    The article highlights the report of Government Accountability Office (GAO) concerning the move of Department of Justice (DOJ) to track corporate crime using the deferred prosecution and non-prosecution agreements (DPAs and NPAs) in the U.S. It examines the effectiveness of DPAs and NPAs to...

  • Criminal Debt: Court-Ordered Restitution Amounts Far Exceed Likely Collections for the Crime Victims in Selected Financial Fraud Cases: GAO-05-80. Engel, Gary T. // GAO Reports;1/31/2005, p1 

    In the wake of a recent wave of corporate scandals, Senator Byron L. Dorgan noted that the American taxpayers have a right to expect that those who have committed corporate fraud and other criminal wrongdoing will be punished, and that the federal government will make every effort to recover...

  • The Clash Over Corporate Crime. Holoubek, Charles; Gordon, Steve // Business NH Magazine;May2007, Vol. 24 Issue 5, p30 

    The article discusses the government policy of divulging the result of any corporate crimes investigations from attorney-client privilege in the U.S.. According to the Thompson Memorandum, prosecutors has the right to waive and disclose attorney-client privileges from the corporations, otherwise...

  • CORPORATE CRIME: Preliminary Observations on DOJ's Use and Oversight of Deferred Prosecution and Non-Prosecution Agreements. Larence, Eileen // GAO Reports;6/25/2009, preceding p1 

    The article presents a report as prepared by the U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO) in relation to the corporate crimes at the Department of Justice (DOJ). GAO studied DOJ's use of deferred prosecution and non-prosecution agreements (DPAs and NPAs), in which prosecutors requires company...

  • RIGHT TO COUNSEL DENIED: CORPORATE CRIMINAL PROSECUTIONS, ATTORNEY FEE AGREEMENTS, AND THE SIXTH AMENDMENT. Barron, Lynsey Morris // Emory Law Journal;2009, Vol. 58 Issue 5, p1265 

    In this article, the author discusses the aspects of the indictment of Arthur Andersen & Co. for shredding documents in connection with the collapse of Enron Corp. It argues that indectment can be a death sentence for a corporation, resulting in catastrophic collateral consequences to a company....

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics