TITLE

The Strange Case of John Honeyman and Revolutionary War Espionage

AUTHOR(S)
Rose, Alexander
PUB. DATE
June 2008
SOURCE
Studies in Intelligence;Jun2008, Vol. 52 Issue 2, p27
SOURCE TYPE
Government Documents
DOC. TYPE
Opinion
ABSTRACT
This author establishes that parts of the revolutionary war espionage story of U.S. secret intelligence agent John Honeyman were invented or plagiarized after the Revolution and assesses the veracity of the story's components. According to the author, there is no record of a Honeyman family in Armagh, Ireland and no evidence of his reluctance to join the army, or of the alleged meeting with the General George Washington in Fort Lee, New Jersey. He also claims that Honeyman's escape from prison and capture and the letter of Washington lack documentation.
ACCESSION #
52919016

 

Related Articles

  • A SPY FOR WASHINGTON. Falkner, Leonard // American Heritage;Aug1957, Vol. 8 Issue 5, p58 

    The article relates the story of how John Honeyman, a supposed loyalist, had helped George Washington obtain a surprise victory at Trenton in the winter of 1776. Honeyman pretended to serve as a spy for the British, particularly for Colonel Johann Gottlieb Rall, the commander of the regiments...

  • George Washington: America's first spymaster. Kross, Peter // Military Intelligence;Jan-Mar91, Vol. 17 Issue 1, p6 

    Describes George Washington as the model for America's future generations of spymasters. Lies told in furthering the nation's cause against Great Britain; Use of secret agents to give false information; Effectivity and success of a spy group called the Culper Ring.

  • Washington's web. Gilgoff, Dan; Bentrup, Nancy // U.S. News & World Report;1/27/2003, Vol. 134 Issue 3, p52 

    As the last congressional delegates arrived in Philadelphia in the waning summer of 1776, a force of 31,000 British troops was devouring New York Harbor and crushing George Washington's Continental Army. Holed up in Manhattan--after losing Long Island, Brooklyn, and 1,400 soldiers in a single...

  • George Washington, Spymaster. Sharma, Arnav // Appleseeds;Jul/Aug2010, Vol. 12 Issue 9, p28 

    The article features the first U.S. President George Washington who was also a spymaster in the country. It mentions that the president who was also a general in the American Revolution has led a whole spy network called the Culper Spy Ring. It notes that the spy network has used word-number...

  • George Washington, Spymaster. Fleming, Thomas // American Heritage;Feb/Mar2000, Vol. 51 Issue 1, p38 

    Features George Washington as a master of espionage whose brilliance helped win the United States Revolution. Overseeing of extensive and sophisticated intelligence activities against the British; Study of Washington's generalship in `The Way of the Fox,' by Daver Richard Palmer; Intelligence...

  • DAR celebrates Washington's birthday.  // East Bernard Express (TX);2/24/2011, Vol. 68 Issue 8, p9 

    The article reports on the celebration of the 279th birthday of former U.S. President George Washington by the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR).

  • Washington's birthday celebrated by local DAR.  // East Bernard Express (TX);3/ 8/2012, Vol. 69 Issue 10, p6 

    The article offers information on the celebration of the Comfort Wood Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) of the 280th birthday of George Washington at the Dragonfly Cafe in Wharton, Texas on February 22, 2012.

  • Three Decisions that Defined George Washington's Leadership Legacy. Tasler, Nick // Harvard Business Review Digital Articles;2/17/2014, p2 

    The article examines some counter-intuitive decisions made by U.S. President George Washington to demonstrate his exceptional leadership including renovations on Mount Vernon during the most tenuous year of the revolution, and his decision not to make himself the supreme leader of the U.S.

  • Spymaster in Chief. Lengel, Edward G. // Military History;Jun/Jul2009, Vol. 26 Issue 2, p26 

    The article looks at the covert operations of Continental Army commander George Washington against the British during the U.S. Revolution. Abraham Woodhull, a farmer from Setauket, Long Island, became a spy in the service of Washington and was responsible for the formation of the Culper spy ring...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of VIRGINIA BEACH PUBLIC LIBRARY AND SYSTEM

Sign out of this library

Other Topics