TITLE

Balancing movement and risk

PUB. DATE
April 2010
SOURCE
Veterinary Record: Journal of the British Veterinary Association;4/10/2010, Vol. 166 Issue 15, p440
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Opinion
ABSTRACT
In this article the author discusses the consultation document from Great Britain's Department for Environment, Food, and Rural Affairs (Defra) on simplifying livestock movement rules in England. He cites that the consultation document should serve to emphasize that biosecurity starts from farms, and veterinary farm health farming can help farmers meet the rules, and increase profitability. Also investigated is the report produced at Defra's request by Somerset dairy farmer Bill Madders in 2006.
ACCESSION #
49252045

 

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