TITLE

Ideology and the dialectics of action: Achebe and Iyayi

AUTHOR(S)
Udumukwu, Onyemaechi
PUB. DATE
September 1996
SOURCE
Research in African Literatures;Fall96, Vol. 27 Issue 3, p34
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Literary Criticism
ABSTRACT
Shows how the individuality and political choice of the characters from the novels of Chinua Achebe and Festus Iyayi are circumscribed within their social matrix. Understanding of action as an inseparable component of the social organization; Orientation of human action toward the attainment of equilibrium in society; Identities of the characters acquired in light of the writers' ideological convictions.
ACCESSION #
9704022080

 

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