TITLE

One witch, two dogs, and a game of ninepins: Cervantes' use of Renaissance dialectic in the

AUTHOR(S)
Kinney, Arthur F.
PUB. DATE
March 1996
SOURCE
International Journal of the Classical Tradition;Spring96, Vol. 2 Issue 4, p487
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Literary Criticism
ABSTRACT
The article offers a literary analysis of Miguel de Cervantes's novel "Coloquio de los perros," or "The Colloquy of Dogs," the best-known of his "Exemplary Novels." Topics include the novel's portrayal of humanist principles and the rational aspects of human nature, a reader-response interpretation, as well as its engagement with the humanistic teaching of dialectic.
ACCESSION #
9612240291

 

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