TITLE

Mirroring the Future Adonais, Elegy, and the Life in Letters

AUTHOR(S)
Sharp, Michele Turner
PUB. DATE
June 2001
SOURCE
Criticism;Summer2001, Vol. 43 Issue 3, p299
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Literary Criticism
ABSTRACT
Focuses on Percy Bysshe Shelley's poem 'Adonais' as an example of English Romantic elegy. Role of elegy as an expanded model of mourning in which melancholia plays a central role; Argument that the poem performs a work of mourning, but does not expunge its melancholia; Poem's manifestation of changes in reading, writing and authorship during the era in which it was written; Poem's framing of its inclusion in the tradition of pastoral elegy.
ACCESSION #
5489127

 

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