TITLE

DECOLONIZING THE IMAGINATION IN THE EARLY WORKS OF VALERIO EVANGELISTI

AUTHOR(S)
OURS, KATHRYN ST.
PUB. DATE
April 2009
SOURCE
Romance Notes;2009, Vol. 49 Issue 2, p247
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Literary Criticism
ABSTRACT
The article discusses the science fiction and fantasy literature of Italian author Valerio Evangelisti, particularly his goal to decolonize the imagination by showing his readers how their beliefs are shaped. It is noted that Evangelisti's writing spans genres and so a definition of science fiction and fantasy is discussed. The novels "Nicolas Eymerich, inquisitore" and "Cherudek" are discussed.
ACCESSION #
53954106

 

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