TITLE

WORDSWORTH'S "DREAM OF THE ARAB" AND CERVANTIES

AUTHOR(S)
Most, Glenn W.
PUB. DATE
March 1985
SOURCE
English Language Notes;Mar1985, Vol. 22 Issue 3, p52
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Literary Criticism
ABSTRACT
Focuses on the theme of the poem 'The Prelude,' by William Wordsworth. Celebration of the narrative dream of the Arab character; History of the errant knight; Genesis of the characters of Wordsworth.
ACCESSION #
4975200

 

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