TITLE

Self-portraits and Self-presentation in the Work of George Gascoigne

AUTHOR(S)
Austen, Gillian
PUB. DATE
May 2008
SOURCE
Early Modern Literary Studies;May2008, Vol. 14 Issue 1, p2
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Literary Criticism
ABSTRACT
In this article, the author discusses the self-portraits and self-presentation in the work of poet George Gascoigne. The author focuses on ten images by Gascoigne that are all forms of self-portrait. He believes that the self-portraits reflect the poet's quest for fame and celebrity or keen eye to posterity. The author also thinks Gascoigne's penitent self-presentation was an attempt to overcome his poor personal reputation and persuade some of his potential and actual patrons that he had reformed his profligate ways.
ACCESSION #
33955211

 

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