TITLE

Milton and the Woman Controversy

AUTHOR(S)
Boocker, David
PUB. DATE
January 2004
SOURCE
Search for Meaning: Critical Essays on Early Modern Literature;2004, p125
SOURCE TYPE
Book
DOC. TYPE
Literary Criticism
ABSTRACT
The article focuses on the view of playwright John Milton on the relationship between men and women as depicted in his poem Paradise Lost. Using the story of Adam and Eve in the Book of Genesis, Milton claimed that the man-woman relationship is hierarchical. His construction of womanhood sees men and women as only morally equals, but not socially.
ACCESSION #
19313746

 

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