TITLE

"Like Tiresias": Metamorphosis and Gender in Clarissa

AUTHOR(S)
Gwilliam, Tassie
PUB. DATE
January 1986
SOURCE
Novel: A Forum on Fiction;Winter1986, Vol. 19 Issue 2, p101
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Literary Criticism
ABSTRACT
Criticizes the book "Clarissa," by Samuel Richardson. Description of the protagonists of the novel; Feminist interpretation of the book, according to literary critic Terry Eagleton in his book "Reading Clarissa: The Struggles of Interpretation"; Use of the term metamorphosis in explaining men's contradictory and entwined desires to identify with and possess women.
ACCESSION #
15746602

 

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