TITLE

Frederick Douglass's My Bondage and My Freedom and the Fugitive Tourist Industry

AUTHOR(S)
Brawley, Lisa
PUB. DATE
September 1996
SOURCE
Novel: A Forum on Fiction;Fall96, Vol. 30 Issue 1, p98
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Literary Criticism
ABSTRACT
Discusses the autobiography `My Bondage and My Freedom,' by Frederick Douglass in light of Frederick Law Olmsted's view of fugitive slaves narrative as a domestic travel account. Douglass' shift to political abolitionism and break with William Lloyd Garrison; Contradiction of a freed slave's lack of freedom; Representation of rhetorics of national progress in the book's engravings.
ACCESSION #
1445352

 

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