TITLE

Unfinalized Moments in Jewish American Narrative

AUTHOR(S)
Royal, Derek Parker
PUB. DATE
April 2004
SOURCE
Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish Studies;Spring2004, Vol. 22 Issue 3, p1
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Literary Criticism
ABSTRACT
In contemporary Jewish American fiction studies, it has become common practice to reference Irving Howe's pronouncement on what he saw as the waning influence of this literature. So much so, in fact, that the constant citation of it begins to take on the cadence of an ironic mantra, one chanted to invoke the spirit of literary authenticity. One is even tempted, given the sound bite-laden culture, to encapsulate his views with the pithy phrase, "the Howe Doctrine." It all began in the introduction to his 1977 collection of Jewish American stories, where Howe broods over his belief that "American Jewish fiction has probably moved past its high point."
ACCESSION #
12943004

 

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