TITLE

The Devil, Not the Pope: Anti-Catholicism and Textual Difference in Doctor Faustus

AUTHOR(S)
Goldfarb, Philip
PUB. DATE
January 2014
SOURCE
Renaissance Papers;2014, Vol. 53, p47
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Literary Criticism
ABSTRACT
A literacy criticism of the play "Doctor Faustus" by Christopher Marlowe is presented.
ACCESSION #
110052170

 

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