TITLE

Lung Cancer Among White South Africans

AUTHOR(S)
Dean, Geoffrey
PUB. DATE
July 1965
SOURCE
British Medical Journal;7/10/1965, Vol. 2 Issue 5453, p111
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Letter
ABSTRACT
No abstract available.
ACCESSION #
64059388

 

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