TITLE

Producing Muscle Movement in Paralysis

AUTHOR(S)
Watson, Shane
PUB. DATE
December 1964
SOURCE
British Medical Journal;12/26/1964, Vol. 2 Issue 5425, p1658
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Letter
ABSTRACT
No abstract available.
ACCESSION #
64056980

 

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