TITLE

Self-managed oral anticoagulation therapy

AUTHOR(S)
Regier, Dean A.; Marra, Carlo A.
PUB. DATE
March 2007
SOURCE
CMAJ: Canadian Medical Association Journal;3/13/2007, Vol. 176 Issue 6, p813
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Letter
ABSTRACT
A response by the authors to a letter to the editor about their article "Cost effectiveness of self-managed versus physician managed oral anticoagulation therapy," in the 2006 issue is presented.
ACCESSION #
24225733

 

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