TITLE

The Emancipation Proclamation

PUB. DATE
August 2017
SOURCE
Emancipation Proclamation (Primary Source Document);8/1/2017, p1
SOURCE TYPE
Primary Source Document
DOC. TYPE
Legal Material
ABSTRACT
The article presents the text of the Emancipation Proclamation issued January 1, 1863, by United States President Abraham Lincoln emancipating every slave held in the Southern States. Lincoln declares that all persons held as slaves in states that rebel against the United States are free. The executive government, including the military and navy will recognize and protect the freedom of freed slaves and will not repress their attempts to seek freedom, according to Lincoln. He goes on to define in which states, or parts of states, his proclamation is effective, as a war measure for suppressing the rebellion of the Southern States.
ACCESSION #
21213401

 

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